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  • #46
    I assume they did the crash scenes at Willow Springs as it would have been prohibitive to recreate Riverside. However, the car didn’t appear to be a J-Car replica. Remember that it was called the Bread Van due to its broad, essentially flat engine cover and vertical tail. The engine cover seemed to slope more like a Mk II.
    The J Car and the 1967 winner shown in the movie are lightly modified Mk II replicas.
    Racing ain't much, but workin's nothing. Richard Tharp

    Lying was a no-brainer for me. Robin Miller

    "I thought they booed [Danica] because she was being a complete jerk, but then they applauded for A.J. Foyt. Now I'm just confused."

    The real world sucks. Ed McCullough

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    • #47
      Originally posted by flatlander_48 View Post
      Very poor taste, in my estimation...
      I agree. The sad part is how many generally accepted tales from the racing world, particularly about fatal crashes, go unquestioned just because it appeared in a book or has been repeated so often. They often have just as many holes in the story as Yates' Ken Miles tale, and are just as easily debunked.
      "Versions of a story that are more tidy, compact, and camera-ready should generally be viewed as historically suspect." - Jackson Landers

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      • #48
        Also, the larger the alleged conspiracy, the more difficult it is to remain a secret. In this case, there would be Ford people, Shelby American people, hospital people, bank people AND FBI people. Too many moving parts for something that is not a top secret, need to know, government deal. It would have made more sense that the guy changed his name, but that didn’t happen either.

        The comment about Shelby’s reaction when presented with the “information”, assuming it happened, was quite predictable. Shelby and Miles were very good friends. How would any of us react if someone said that your friend, who you know died, was alive? And further, if that did happen, wouldn’t it seem plausible that you would try to help your friend, at least financially? No, this whole thing has a stench about it...

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        • #49
          Eu-reak-a......I think you've gawt'it!
          "Those were the days my friends. We thought they'd never end....."

          jimclark

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          • #50
            I'm confident not one bit of it happened.

            It's as if Yates' whole premise was: "Ha ha! made ya think!" Again, the only part of it that would be even somewhat excusable would be if it was his answer to rumors someone had already started.
            Last edited by JThur1; 11-30-2019, 09:37 PM.
            "Versions of a story that are more tidy, compact, and camera-ready should generally be viewed as historically suspect." - Jackson Landers

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            • #51
              Mrs goner and I saw it yesterday on the big screen. We both liked it and the actors a lot. Great sound. I barely followed sports cars at the time and if their was some less than cold facts that was fine.
              When Shelby tossed the nut into the Ferrari pit reminded me of an old story told to me long ago by my Hot Rodding BIL Wimpy.
              He was in close friendly competition and his friend/competitor built up a new engine and said he was going give Wimpy a whoop in’ at the track. The night before the race, Wimpy claimed to have sneaked into the guys garage and spread BB’s around where they would be seen and on top of the engine. The guy came in the next day and “knew” bb’s were down into the manifold and heads. Instead of racing he pulled the new motor. Later they all had a good laugh and some beers and the conspirators helped put the thing back together. Quite a stunt if true. Wimpy could tell tall tales and spin the Bull for hours when it came to hot rodding, he may have even made it up.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by FormulaFox View Post
                SThe scene where the cars are being set for the start and we get the comment(regarding the Ferraris, "If this was a beauty contest, we just lost."




                .................I DISAGREE. :P
                To each his own. I win 'cause I like 'em both.
                Ps beautiful, GTs handsome. If ya' crossed 'em, you'd end up with a Tullius XJR.

                https://www.mecum.com/lots/CA0813-16...-gtp-race-car/
                "Those were the days my friends. We thought they'd never end....."

                jimclark

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by jimclark View Post
                  To each his own. I win 'cause I like 'em both.
                  Ps beautiful, GTs handsome. If ya' crossed 'em, you'd end up with a Tullius XJR.

                  https://www.mecum.com/lots/CA0813-16...-gtp-race-car/
                  I'm not the biggest fan of the 60s/70s era sportscar shapes - the early days of real aero work looks really wonky in most cases. But the ones I do like don't tend to be the ones others bring up a lot. All too often the swoopy "beautiful" shapes of cars like the 917 have the one weird detail that spoils the look for me. The result I like the more muscular looks of things like the Ford GT40, Lola T70, and the Ford Mk IV. The T70 and Mk IV in particular have the swoopy lines, but they're combined with a beefiness that exudes an aura that other prominent cars of the era just don't have.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by FormulaFox View Post

                    I'm not the biggest fan of the 60s/70s era sportscar shapes - the early days of real aero work looks really wonky in most cases. But the ones I do like don't tend to be the ones others bring up a lot. All too often the swoopy "beautiful" shapes of cars like the 917 have the one weird detail that spoils the look for me. The result I like the more muscular looks of things like the Ford GT40, Lola T70, and the Ford Mk IV. The T70 and Mk IV in particular have the swoopy lines, but they're combined with a beefiness that exudes an aura that other prominent cars of the era just don't have.
                    60s and 70s "wonky" shapes? Don't you think you've got it backwards?
                    The cars today are the "wonky" sheit with all the aero crap; which I have a deep appreciation for regarding function but sure the hello not for aesthetics.
                    Now the main concern is downforce (thus all the ugly aero holes and and wings and bits...) as regulations (cars and circuits) are all being set to keep top speeds down. Faster around corners, sooner to top speed on straights, lower lap times. No more 251s down 3 mile "Mulsanne"s. http://www.mulsannescorner.com/maxspeed.html
                    The early years of aero was to be as slick (equaling beauty) as possible (with small bits to keep them on the ground) to maximize straightline speed.
                    'Agreed on the feline and canine differentiation as I stated above and in https://www.ferrarichat.com/forum/threads/more-old-photos.89883/page-435#post-146897973 (post #10,873)
                    Appreciating both doubles the enjoyment.
                    Hello, Tullius' XJRs of the eighties incorporated both.
                    lurve.gif

                    P.S. The T-70 "swoopy"? Oh. Yikes.

                    Lola-T70-Mk3-Coupe-Chevrolet-3580.jpg

                    And that's the last version. Now that is wonky....to each his own..... shrug.gif






                    Key: hello is not hell-o and sheit is she-it.











                    "Those were the days my friends. We thought they'd never end....."

                    jimclark

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                    • #55
                      Yes, the T70 is swoopy. Not as much as the Ferrari 330s or Porsche 917, but it is - like I said, it combines it with a unique beefiness. The thing with those early straight-line speed aero packages is that it was still early and they never quite looked right because of it. The Group C/GTP cars were a much better balance of the need for straightline smoothness and downforce - prior to the "let's kill a good thing" 3.5-liter regulation overhaul, that is.

                      Yeah, and I don't deny that today's cars are a bit wonky as well, but.... Let's be honest, MOST of the 60s/70s Le Mans racers looked like gigantic loaves of bread on four wheels. There's a reason people talk about cars like the 917, GT40, 330, and even cars that never won like the 512 and T70 or never even raced like the P68. They stand out in an ocean of "What the bleep were they thinking."

                      The GT40 will forever be my favorite wingless sports racer. But my all-time favorite is, and will likely remain, the Chevrolet Corvette GTP - No crazy modern aerodynamics, no excessively swoopy early aero. Just smooth, simple, and purposeful. A close second for my all would be the 2005-2007 open-top Lola LMPs. (which should speak volumes for where my aesthetic preferences lie)
                      Last edited by FormulaFox; 12-08-2019, 05:16 PM.

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                      • #57
                        Originally posted by jimclark View Post

                        60s and 70s "wonky" shapes? Don't you think you've got it backwards?
                        The cars today are the "wonky" sheit with all the aero crap; which I have a deep appreciation for regarding function but sure the hello not for aesthetics.
                        Now the main concern is downforce (thus all the ugly aero holes and and wings and bits...) as regulations (cars and circuits) are all being set to keep top speeds down. Faster around corners, sooner to top speed on straights, lower lap times. No more 251s down 3 mile "Mulsanne"s. http://www.mulsannescorner.com/maxspeed.html
                        The early years of aero was to be as slick (equaling beauty) as possible (with small bits to keep them on the ground) to maximize straightline speed.
                        'Agreed on the feline and canine differentiation as I stated above and in https://www.ferrarichat.com/forum/threads/more-old-photos.89883/page-435#post-146897973 (post #10,873)
                        Appreciating both doubles the enjoyment.
                        Hello, Tullius' XJRs of the eighties incorporated both.
                        lurve.gif

                        P.S. The T-70 "swoopy"? Oh. Yikes.

                        Lola-T70-Mk3-Coupe-Chevrolet-3580.jpg

                        And that's the last version. Now that is wonky....to each his own..... shrug.gif






                        Key: hello is not hell-o and sheit is she-it.










                        Remember it was Eric Broadley who said that wings were for people who couldn’t design suspensions, or some such nonsense...

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