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  • Memo Update

    For the latest interview with Memo Gidley click here.

    Short version - he still has no ride, but wants one -- CART or IRL. He plans on running Indy.
    "If TF members were given solid gold cars, some would complain about the color." - stnkypete

  • #2
    In the interview, Memo talks about the outcome of races being determined by fuel strategy, and how many aren't happy about this. I can definitely see how a team could be frustrated when they've got the car really hooked up, but get beaten by a team that does the race in one less pit stop. But, as a fan, I often find these to be the most exciting races, whether it's CART or IRL, oval or road course. You're sitting on the edge of your seat waiting to see if the leader sputters, as the guy in second is going [email protected] and catching up.
    "I never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy, as cause for withdrawing from a friend." - Thomas Jefferson

    RIP, Dan. You will always be one of my heroes.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by sf-indy-fan:
      <STRONG>In the interview, Memo talks about the outcome of races being determined by fuel strategy, and how many aren't happy about this. I can definitely see how a team could be frustrated when they've got the car really hooked up, but get beaten by a team that does the race in one less pit stop. But, as a fan, I often find these to be the most exciting races, whether it's CART or IRL, oval or road course. You're sitting on the edge of your seat waiting to see if the leader sputters, as the guy in second is going [email protected] and catching up. </STRONG>

      He might be refering to the fact that cart limits the amount of fuel provided for each race. Every car must economize on fuel consumption all during the race in order to have enough to finish.

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      • #4
        I wish him well, he belongs.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by vegasduo:
          <STRONG>


          He might be refering to the fact that cart limits the amount of fuel provided for each race.</STRONG>
          It ain't just CART that limits fuel.

          The problem is the way turbo engines work. A n/a engine like in the IRL makes it's best power when it is running lean, and adding more fuel won't make more power. With a turbo engine to make the most power you have to run the engine real rich. If you ran a turbo CART engine at max power you would use more fuel then you are allowed, so you have to reduce your power to run the whole race.
          "IRL" ... what IS that anyway?

          J. Michael Ringham
          Vice President, Marketing
          IndyCar® Series Indy Pro Series

          www.jonescams.com yankeegoback.com

          Comment


          • #6
            On of the most satisfying road wins in memory was CART Portland in, I think, 1998. It was deFerran's last year with Walker in the Valvoline car, and everyone was running a two stop strategy. Walker had deFerran on an 3-stop all-out full-rich gonzo strategy, resulting in deFerran having more horsepower than the other leaders but needing a huge lead to cover a splash.

            With some absolutely beautiful edgy driving, he built about a 27 second lead on P2. After his splash, he came out in front to hold the lead to the checkered. Sometime the fuel milage races are a letdown, but this one was very rewarding.

            Welcome to the IRL, Gil deFerran! Hopefully we'll have a ride for one of my favorite drivers Memo Gidley, too.

            Racemind: Kim Kardashian Indy Watch : Twitter.com/racemind
            "If NASCAR didn't want us to sleep through the race then why did they give us a COT?"

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm not sure if I buy that reasoning CamKing.

              Doesn't it really boil down to the number of stops you have to make rather than the amount of fuel alloted?

              Can you go fast enough at full rich to make up for the time required for the extra fuel stop? Or do you sacrifice a little power/speed to avoid the extra stop, while leaving fuel in the pit tank after the race?
              BAN SHREDDED CHEESE! MAKE AMERICA GRATE AGAIN!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Jakester:
                <STRONG>I'm not sure if I buy that reasoning CamKing.

                Doesn't it really boil down to the number of stops you have to make rather than the amount of fuel alloted?

                Can you go fast enough at full rich to make up for the time required for the extra fuel stop? Or do you sacrifice a little power/speed to avoid the extra stop, while leaving fuel in the pit tank after the race?</STRONG>
                The number of stops you make is something that comes into play in all racing. In the IRL you try to make the engine get better milage and try to not turn as many RPM. I remember a Texas race where Comptechs engines finished 1-5, because they could stay out longer. The difference is the engines were still making the same HP as the other engines.

                In CART you have to cut the power down to use less fuel, so if you want to try and run 1 less stop, you will have to run a lot slower.

                The other difference is, If you run full rich in CART you will not have enough fuel to finish the race unless you get a few yellows. That is why you see some CART races where they don't start racing until the end.

                In every form of racing teams are using fuel strategy, but in Turbo racing it becomes a bigger part of the racing.

                A NA engine makes it's best power when the engine is lean, but if you lean it down to far you will burn it down. There are no power advantages to richen up a NA engine.
                The biggest move used for fuel efficiency is to have the driver drop the RPM by putting it in the cruise gear.

                A Turbo engine makes it's best power when they add more fuel. When you lean down a Turbo engine the power falls off quite a bit. Leaning a turbo engine down won't burn the engine down because it cuts the boost down at the same time.
                "IRL" ... what IS that anyway?

                J. Michael Ringham
                Vice President, Marketing
                IndyCar® Series Indy Pro Series

                www.jonescams.com yankeegoback.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  I don't disagree with how it works.

                  I believe though that CART gives the teams enough fuel to run the entire race rich.

                  However, an extra stop to get that fuel takes longer than running lean and having one less stop.

                  Hence the discussion last year of requiring a minimum number of stops where at least one tire needed to be changed (one takes as long as 4 so you might as well do 4 and enough fuel while changes tires allows teams to run rich the whole race).

                  I wish CART would change the rule to this.

                  [ January 22, 2002: Message edited by: Mista Bone ]

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mista Bone:
                    <STRONG>I don't disagree with how it works.

                    I believe though that CART gives the teams enough fuel to run the entire race rich.
                    </STRONG>
                    I know for a fact they don't. They give them enough fuel to race based on 1.8 mpg.(I dont know if that is still the exact # for oval races). If they turn the engine full rich they won't get anything close to that mpg. This has been a fact as long as there have been turbos.
                    "IRL" ... what IS that anyway?

                    J. Michael Ringham
                    Vice President, Marketing
                    IndyCar® Series Indy Pro Series

                    www.jonescams.com yankeegoback.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Probably true, and holds down speeds as well.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mista Bone:
                        <STRONG>Probably true, and holds down speeds as well.</STRONG>
                        That was part of the reasoning behind the rule. You can get around the boost limit by turning the engine harder, but you can only make a certain amount of power for a given amount of fuel.
                        "IRL" ... what IS that anyway?

                        J. Michael Ringham
                        Vice President, Marketing
                        IndyCar® Series Indy Pro Series

                        www.jonescams.com yankeegoback.com

                        Comment

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