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Is Indy suffering from supporting the IRL?

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  • Is Indy suffering from supporting the IRL?

    Do you think it is/was a mistake to tie the Indianapolis 500 directly to the IRL?

    After following years of contentuous arguments and conversations about the "Split" and all the myriad reasons and excuses for successes and failures of teams and drivers I wonder: Could a bit different approach have retained a more amicable atmosphere in American OW racing without the fragmentation of effort and support we now witness?

    I do not propose this as a discusion of CART versus IRL but as an exercise in determining why we were subjected to gambling the image and future of Indy on an untried and unknown fledgling race series to be.

    To start it off I will offer a quote and an oppinion.

    I will create a series of "Competitive, inexpensive racing for deserving young American oval track drivers" We all agree that was a very noble statement and was recieved with much acclaim and support by many, including myself.

    My opinion is that George misjudged the momentum of support for his proposed IRL and had to backtrack at the expense of all involved. I believe the 25/8 statement tossed out like a guantlet was one of several divisive measures which led to the deep feelings, harsh words and declining interest and support we have lived with the past 10 years of so. I believe a more amicable parting would have benefitted his move even if he had grinned through gritted teeth. The message would have been similar but the public image on both sides would have been less damaged.

  • #2
    I tossed the above out partly in light of the interest in the GP Masters and the display of emotion and enjoyment we are seeing just from appreciating men who showed us the very best in racing.

    It does not really matter where a guy comes from but how he treads the path he takes that strikes our fancy. We always just seem to enjoy watching the very best do what they do well. I think that is what we would like to see continuing at Indy and in our own racing series.

    Comment


    • #3
      I don't know what the original question really has to do with the follow-up, but I think having the Indianapolis 500 and the series that provides the bulk of competitors "on the same side" is a good idea, both management-wise and from the marketing standpoint.

      I think the 500 has benefitted from having the series in attracting (and re-attracting) virtually all of the top U.S. open wheel teams, as well as having given teams like Panther, D&R, Cheever and Hemelgarn the chance to build.

      Most of the diminished popularity has been due to the prolonged boycott and acrimony which could have been avoided anyway, as evidenced by the returns of Andretti, Penske, Rahal, Fernandez and others.

      The ratings and attendance are gaining again, and the coming schedule should be strong and exciting. I think both the Indianapolis 500 and the series are now set to be as strong and secure for the future as they ever were.
      "Each day well lived makes every yesterday a dream of happiness and every tomorrow a vision of hope. Look well therefore to this one day for it, and it alone, is life"
      ~ Sanskrit poem attributed to Kalidasa, "Salutation to the Dawn"


      Brian's Wish

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Turn13
        I don't know what the original question really has to do with the follow-up, but I think having the Indianapolis 500 and the series that provides the bulk of competitors "on the same side" is a good idea, both management-wise and from the marketing standpoint.

        I think the 500 has benefitted from having the series in attracting (and re-attracting) virtually all of the top U.S. open wheel teams, as well as having given teams like Panther, D&R, Cheever and Hemelgarn the chance to build.

        Most of the diminished popularity has been due to the prolonged boycott and acrimony which could have been avoided anyway, as evidenced by the returns of Andretti, Penske, Rahal, Fernandez and others.

        The ratings and attendance are gaining again, and the coming schedule should be strong and exciting. I think both the Indianapolis 500 and the series are now set to be as strong and secure for the future as they ever were.
        Thanks, I was hoping for anwers of this sort.

        I felt at the time the throwing down of the 25/8 thing caused most of the dissention.

        My reply to my own message was to point up that people who are fans of racing can enjoy racing and the men who do it just for the sake of racing. We do not have to have tunnel vision but can appreciate it all.

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        • #5
          And another sactioning body instuted a 35/8 rule to protect their regular drivers and virtually nobody sneezed, had a fit, boycotted, or anything else in responce.
          Witnessed Mario's "Miracle at Indy"...Watched 3 win their 4th Indy 500...Was there for Petty's 200th win...Saw the last Novi qualify

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          • #6
            Originally posted by fivehundred2go
            And another sactioning body instuted a 35/8 rule to protect their regular drivers and virtually nobody sneezed, had a fit, boycotted, or anything else in responce.
            Oh, it seems they had a bit more going for themselves at the time than the new and untried IRL at Indy.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Benson477
              Oh, it seems they had a bit more going for themselves at the time than the new and untried IRL at Indy.
              how does that change in any way whether the rule was right or wrong?

              either both are right or both are wrong

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              • #8
                Originally posted by cleanupcrew
                how does that change in any way whether the rule was right or wrong?
                either both are right or both are wrong
                Dunno, wasn't discussing right or wrong. Was discussing effect.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Benson477
                  Do you think it is/was a mistake to tie the Indianapolis 500 directly to the IRL?
                  No. I think the founding of the IRL was the most courageous risk taken in American sports promotion since the founding of the AFL in 1960. It saved open wheel from becomig a totally worthless venture.

                  The fact that various people at various times have done less than what they should do (100% support the IRL as the only legitimate form of North American open-wheel competition) is their problem and does not take away in any way from the Indianapolis 500.

                  I celebrate the 33 heroes who are there. The other 250M or so people who don't take the checker are on their own.

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                  • #10
                    The new Cart has 2 ovals, that's not enough for open wheel racing in this country...you couldn't see that in 1978?

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                    • #11
                      h
                      Keeping You Alert Since 12-01-2000!

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                      • #12
                        "I will create a series of "Competitive, inexpensive racing for deserving young American oval track drivers" We all agree that was a very noble statement and was recieved with much acclaim and support by many, including myself."

                        I got caught up in that lie too.....
                        "It's not the split, it's not the lack of marketing, it's not the days the races run on, it's the product." Tommy Kendall

                        "....and the DRIVERS are the product !" SJFast

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Turn13
                          having the Indianapolis 500 and the series that provides the bulk of competitors "on the same side" is a good idea, both management-wise and from the marketing standpoint.
                          I don't disagree...the only problem is that it was neither managed or marketed...

                          BTW...IMO the thing that made the Indianapolis 500 what it was, was that it was a "stand alone" event. I recognize it's ties to AAA, USAC, etc...however, other series cleared the way for guys like Graham Hill, Jackie Stewart, Cale Yarborough, Bobby Allison to attend. People wanted to come because just doing well there made a career. Winning made you a superstar. It was big enough that people would go out and buy equipment, etc...just to try to run that one race.

                          That's no longer the case.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I think perhaps the IRL does hurt the 500, (aside from all the split bs) because it creates competition for it. If you live in Ky, Nashville, Chicago, or Michigan, you can go to a race their and see most of the same drivers. So maybe you won't go to the I500. Same with TV.

                            I think the poster above is correct, that when the 500 was biggest, it was not really part of another series, and it got stars from everywhere. Problem is that that no longer works. All the other series place so many time constraints on drivers its prett hard for them to compete in the 500.

                            I'm not saying the solution is to change anything, or get rid of the IRL, since I like being able to see the races. As for solutions, well I don't have any.
                            Randy

                            "Danica has earned her equipment and her opportunity. It didn't just materialize out of the air. She earned it one piece at a time, starting at 10 years old." Mark Martin

                            "Life does not imitate art. It imitates bad television." Unidentified TV Talking Head.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Radny, snipped
                              I think the poster above is correct, that when the 500 was biggest, it was not really part of another series, and it got stars from everywhere. Problem is that that no longer works. All the other series place so many time constraints on drivers its pretty hard for them to compete in the 500.
                              Exactly. This would have happened regardless of an IRL or no IRL. In fact, it was already happening years before the existence of the IRL.
                              "I didn't hear a single comment about airboxes, "carbashians", or how terrible the car looked. I did see dozens and dozens of little kids in awe of the speed and how cool the cars looked. We should learn from our children."
                              --Danny Noonan

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