Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Why did General Motors leave the IRL....

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Why did General Motors leave the IRL....

    ....if some of their executives are thinking about Formula 1?

    From the Winston Salem Journal...


    Oct. 29, 2005

    COMPILED BY MIKE MULHERN


    • General Motors executives, at some of the highest levels, have been approached about mounting an American-based Formula One effort, with Goodyear backing. Ford Motor Company just got out of a lengthy and ill-fated $100 million a year Formula One program, however, and GM men are not enthusiastic about any F1 effort, given the company's economic situation.

    Nevertheless, F1's need to cultivate the American market, particularly after the Indianapolis debacle, could be a factor. Formula One's new single-tire-company rules will apparently go into effect for 2007, a year earlier than originally planned. And Goodyear could be a player. The Michelin-Bridgestone tire war this season led to the Indianapolis Grand Prix debacle; the two companies together spent some $170 million this year in F1.

    Goodyear's Stu Grant, head of racing, said Goodyear could make a bid for the F1 exclusivity if it made marketing sense. Goodyear is the No. 2 tire seller in Western Europe, but Bridgestone, through its F1 marketing, has been making significant gains there. Michelin, in turn, is using its F1 marketing to make major gains in the Far East, where the Chinese market is booming.

    Goodyear executives, if worried about Bridgestone taking market-share in Western Europe, and if interested in attacking the booming Asian market, where Goodyear has little presence, could very well make a move back into Formula One.

    © 2005 Winston-Salem Journal. The Winston-Salem Journal is a Media General newspaper.
    quote:
    "It is sad that open-wheel racing has become a buy a ride situation, but it is what it is."

  • #2
    Look at the size of the fanbase of the IRL compared to the worldwide following of F1. Thats your answer in a nutshell. I don't see GM doing it right now, but if they do, thats the reason.
    Preserving America's oval track tradition:
    1.New Hampshire, 2.Charlotte, 3.Dover, 4.Disney World, 5.Las Vegas, 6.Atlanta, 7.Gateway, 8.Nazereth, 9.Phoenix, 10.Fontana, 11.Pikes Peak, 12.Michigan.

    Comment


    • #3
      reading that made it sound like others approached GM, and GM wasnt interested.

      GM men are not enthusiastic about any F1 effort, given the company's economic situation.

      Comment


      • #4
        When reading the WS Journal......

        When reading the Winston-Salem Journal.....consider the source....I think they sort of throw stuff out and see what sticks......When you think MIke Mulhern, think Robin Miller......

        Comment


        • #5
          "GM executives.....have been approached...." , yes, Cygni, you have it
          right. BUT, what does "with Goodyear backing" mean? Could Goodyear make
          it worthwhile to GM like they did for Dan Gurney in the 60's? I doubt it, but
          what do I know?
          "It is a besetting vice of democracies to substitute public opinion for law. This is the usual form in which masses of men exhibit their tyranny." - James Fenimore Cooper

          "One man with courage is a majority." - Thomas Jefferson

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by chrisg
            When reading the Winston-Salem Journal.....consider the source....I think they sort of throw stuff out and see what sticks......When you think MIke Mulhern, think Robin Miller......
            This year I have on occasion seen the same event covered by a number of papers, and felt he had the most unbiased report. JMO.
            quote:
            "It is sad that open-wheel racing has become a buy a ride situation, but it is what it is."

            Comment


            • #7
              So now we are getting our Formula One news from Mike Mulhern of the Winston-Salem, North Carolina newspaper?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by KenK
                what does "with Goodyear backing" mean?
                F-1 seems likely to become a one-tire series according to press reports. Michelin says it won't be them if that's the case.

                It's hard to decide which company--Goodyear or GM--is in bigger financial trouble, however. Neither makes products of any interest to me.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by lkchris
                  Neither makes products of any interest to me.
                  What is not to like about the CTS-V? That car kicks behind!

                  To answer the question posed by the original thread... "Why did General Motors leave the IRL"... low Return on Investment. That is why everyone leaves the IRL.
                  "The problem with internet quotes and statistics is that often times, they're wrongfully believed to be real." - Abraham Lincoln

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by LorenzoBandini
                    What is not to like about the CTS-V? That car kicks behind!

                    To answer the question posed by the original thread... "Why did General Motors leave the IRL"... low Return on Investment. That is why everyone leaves the IRL.
                    The only thing I didn't like about the CTS-V I drove was the shifter. Felt like a knife in a jar of peanut butter. Other than that it was a lot of fun. 400hp and no waiting! Now if they'll put the 500hp mill in from the new Z06....
                    "I would really like to go to NASCAR. I really enjoy NASCAR and if I could be there in a couple of years that's where I'd want to be." - Jeff Gordon (after testing a Formula Super Vee)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      With their financial and upcoming financial problems, I don't see how GM could pull this off without really ticking off the unions. Let's see, we're going to cut wages, benefits, and retirement, but we're also doing this F1 thing......

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        edited due to double post - don't know why
                        Last edited by Spike; 11-01-2005, 10:50 AM.
                        "I would really like to go to NASCAR. I really enjoy NASCAR and if I could be there in a couple of years that's where I'd want to be." - Jeff Gordon (after testing a Formula Super Vee)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          When you consider how much F1 teams spend in F1 every year (Ferrari - $300 million plus, Toyota - $300 million plus, Honda - $300 million plus, you get the idea), there is no way GM could justify the cost.

                          If they can't spend a few million to support a couple of teams in the IRL, there is no way they are going to spend a few hundred million in F1 to support 1 team. The cost of 1 F1 engine could probably support one IRL team for a season.

                          What would they call it anyways? Maybe Vauxhall, Opel, or Cadillac?
                          Life is short, respect all forms of motorsports!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I don't see GM getting into F1 with all of their financial problems.

                            They are potentially on the hook for billions of dollars just in obligations to Delphi employees (who were GM employees at the time that Delhi was spun off from GM) for their retirements funds.

                            As far as GM vehicles go, I have a 1999 Chevy S-10 that is a great truck, and my wife bought a 2005 Chevy Cobalt in June of this year. That is a nice little car.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I doubt GM would ever do F1.

                              1. They have too many brands around the world. Only Chevrolet is sold in most markets, but outside of North America and Middle East, they are mainly either rebadged Opels or Daewoos. Cadillac is a niche car outside of North America.

                              Opel does not sell as a brand in North America or Australia/NZ. They use Holden down there. In China it is Buick and Chevrolet.

                              2. GM cannot afford it, both politically or monetarily.

                              3. GM has never had the committment to high dollar programs. They expect results for marketing before it even starts. Some one pulls the plug 2nd or 3rd season. Not in it for the long haul. The IRL and CART were an exception, but they were relatively cheap until recently. They are even reviewing NASCAR to see if it is worth all the money spent to race common template cars.
                              And don't forget the heat!

                              Comment

                              Unconfigured Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X