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Top 10 IndyCar TV cities

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  • Top 10 IndyCar TV cities

    From Robin MIller
    Top 10 cities for IndyCar ratings
    1 Indianapolis 3.78
    2 Milwaukee 1.62
    3 Dayton, OH 1.59
    4 West Palm Beach 1.57
    5 Ft. Myers 1.55
    6 Sacramento 1.40
    7 Richmond 1.36
    8 Columbus, OH 1.32
    9 Cincinnati 1.31
    10 Tulsa 1.30
    https://racer.com/2019/10/07/axr-lik...entry-in-2020/
    BAN SHREDDED CHEESE! MAKE AMERICA GRATE AGAIN!

  • #2
    Remember that “cities” is actually DMAs. Indy DMA is 32 counties. A resident of any place in the DMA has an equal random chance of being in the survey.

    Indy is not surprising, nor is surrounding midwestern markets. The Florida retirement places, flush with retirees from elsewhere is also understandable. Richmond, which is also a top NASCAR market, is explainable by that.

    Somebody help me with Tulsa and Sacramento.

    Comment


    • #3
      There's a law in Sacramento that requires viewership. Tulsa? What else you gonna do in OK?
      "Loyalty to petrified opinions never yet broke a chain or freed a human soul in this world — and never will." Mark Twain

      Comment


      • #4
        In reading the article and Miller's comments on each market the Indycar schedule makes no sense nor do the viewing or attendance habits of fans of the series. It's a short list to be sure but with three of the top 10 in Ohio and 2 in Florida you wonder why there aren't more races in those states or why those people don't really show up for races nearby. It's a joke that Miller mentions that Dayton is that close to Mid-Ohio and Detroit events and throws in Eldora as though there's a huge crossover.


        If Miller really wants to go farther to figure out what Indycar should do he needs to look up the numbers for the places the series does race and the major markets where they don't. The series races in Des Moines, Birmingham, St. Pete, St Louis, Detroit, maybe you want to call Road America in the Sheboygan market, Austin, Dallas/Fort Worth, how far down the list are those markets and then look at Chicago, Kansas city, Miami, even Phoenix again, New Hampshire again, and ask the tough question, are we racing in the wrong places? If the genuine attedance is weak at most places, setting aside the over estimates, should the series race at venues that have slightly weaker attendance if the TV ratings are higher there and the sponsor interest is higher? Then even go so far as to compare how all the numbers match up to NASCAR.
        "You can't arrest those guys, they're folk heroes"
        "They're criminals"
        "Well most folk heroes started out as criminals"

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        • #5
          Because I'm in Sacramento?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Z28 View Post
            In reading the article and Miller's comments on each market the Indycar schedule makes no sense nor do the viewing or attendance habits of fans of the series. It's a short list to be sure but with three of the top 10 in Ohio and 2 in Florida you wonder why there aren't more races in those states or why those people don't really show up for races nearby. It's a joke that Miller mentions that Dayton is that close to Mid-Ohio and Detroit events and throws in Eldora as though there's a huge crossover.


            If Miller really wants to go farther to figure out what Indycar should do he needs to look up the numbers for the places the series does race and the major markets where they don't. The series races in Des Moines, Birmingham, St. Pete, St Louis, Detroit, maybe you want to call Road America in the Sheboygan market, Austin, Dallas/Fort Worth, how far down the list are those markets and then look at Chicago, Kansas city, Miami, even Phoenix again, New Hampshire again, and ask the tough question, are we racing in the wrong places? If the genuine attedance is weak at most places, setting aside the over estimates, should the series race at venues that have slightly weaker attendance if the TV ratings are higher there and the sponsor interest is higher? Then even go so far as to compare how all the numbers match up to NASCAR.
            I don't think there is a Sheboygan DMA. Road America is likely in Milwaukee from a DMA standpoint. From the standpoint of where fans come from, it is likely Chicago, Milwaukee, Madison, and Green Bay, roughly in that order, although Chicago and Milwaukee could flip based on what DMA you put Kenosha and Walworth counties in.

            THE REAL QUESTION NO ONE IS TALKING ABOUT:

            Where is Indycar UNDERPERFORMING and where can Indycar make significant gains? Where's Indycar in New York, Chicago, LA, Houston and Philly? And what are they doing about it?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by SamC View Post
              Somebody help me with Tulsa and Sacramento.
              Sacramento was always an open wheel city. It has a great heritage of open wheel racing. Considering the graying of the audience, quite possibly it is still those folks (or their kids).
              "Versions of a story that are more tidy, compact, and camera-ready should generally be viewed as historically suspect." - Jackson Landers

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Bullwinkle View Post

                I don't think there is a Sheboygan DMA. Road America is likely in Milwaukee from a DMA standpoint. From the standpoint of where fans come from, it is likely Chicago, Milwaukee, Madison, and Green Bay, roughly in that order, although Chicago and Milwaukee could flip based on what DMA you put Kenosha and Walworth counties in.

                THE REAL QUESTION NO ONE IS TALKING ABOUT:

                Where is Indycar UNDERPERFORMING and where can Indycar make significant gains? Where's Indycar in New York, Chicago, LA, Houston and Philly? And what are they doing about it?
                New York, you say? https://jalopnik.com/cars-are-death-...sig-1838874851

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by SamC View Post
                  Remember that “cities” is actually DMAs. Indy DMA is 32 counties. A resident of any place in the DMA has an equal random chance of being in the survey.

                  Indy is not surprising, nor is surrounding midwestern markets. The Florida retirement places, flush with retirees from elsewhere is also understandable. Richmond, which is also a top NASCAR market, is explainable by that.

                  Somebody help me with Tulsa and Sacramento.
                  There has been a real effort to advertise IndyCar and it's races at the Chili Bowl and Tulsa Shootout for the last few years. Gateway (WWT Raceway) has bought a lot of advertising pushing their IndyCar race in particular at the event. They sponsor areas at the event, do giveaways and other things to reach attendees and competitors directly. The series has also made the effort. Also, believe it or not, Max Pappas is a fixture at the event. He has a company that is involved with racing steering wheels and he makes it a part of his marketing plan. You can usually see him on and around the track.

                  Mess with me and you mess with the whole trailer park.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Part of the ongoing interest in motorsports in Dayton and Cinci are the radio talk show segments devoted to racing. WING ESPN Radio (Dayton) has a weekly racing report and has for years. While it's primarily focused on the taxi cabs, Indycar comes up frequently from the hosts and callers. On WLW (Cinci) Bill "Seg" Dennison hosts the racing report on Sunday evenings and frequently interviews Indycar drivers after a big win. He always gets the Indy 500 winner on Sunday night after the win earlier in the day.
                    Last edited by Big Mo; 10-09-2019, 02:14 PM.
                    "Indycars should be beasts." - Gil de Ferran
                    @bigmo500

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I know a few TF posters are here in Richmond.

                      Collectively, the handful of us should receive full credit for the RVA viewership numbers. I look forward to my signed letter of gratitude from Mark Miles.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Looking at the list, seems like big Indycar TV markets are basically places with a lack of pro sports team.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          "For most of its fifteen years, the Vancouver Indy attracted in excess of 100,000 spectators over the course of its weekends, and in 1996 held the Canadian single-day sporting event attendance record until it was beaten by the Formula 1 Canadian Grand Prix in Montreal that year. [1] The final event in 2004 had race day attendance of 63,000 with a total three day turnout of 158,420 spectators"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Bullwinkle View Post

                            I don't think there is a Sheboygan DMA. Road America is likely in Milwaukee from a DMA standpoint. From the standpoint of where fans come from, it is likely Chicago, Milwaukee, Madison, and Green Bay, roughly in that order, although Chicago and Milwaukee could flip based on what DMA you put Kenosha and Walworth counties in.

                            THE REAL QUESTION NO ONE IS TALKING ABOUT:

                            Where is Indycar UNDERPERFORMING and where can Indycar make significant gains? Where's Indycar in New York, Chicago, LA, Houston and Philly? And what are they doing about it?
                            LA does not follow motorsports, NASCAR gets buried there. The track manager at Fontana learned Spanish so she could market, did not help. They used to run Cup races there twice a year, cut back to one in 2011 and that one is not doing wonderfully.

                            Typically, ratings for a NASCAR race in LA are half the national average and drag the Neilsens down.

                            CART and ICS have been in and out of Fontana.

                            ICS races at Long Beach with reasonable success and that is likely as good as they are going to do.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Jim Wilke View Post

                              LA does not follow motorsports, NASCAR gets buried there. The track manager at Fontana learned Spanish so she could market, did not help. They used to run Cup races there twice a year, cut back to one in 2011 and that one is not doing wonderfully.

                              Typically, ratings for a NASCAR race in LA are half the national average and drag the Neilsens down.

                              CART and ICS have been in and out of Fontana.

                              ICS races at Long Beach with reasonable success and that is likely as good as they are going to do.
                              Since trends still start in California, and IndyCar has two races there, I feel like their Marketing department needs to take on the challenge of raising the series profile. There is so much car culture in Southern California, maybe somebody can learn to market it.

                              Comment

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