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Kentucky Track Grinding.........

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  • Kentucky Track Grinding.........

    Wasn't this the same guy that said they wouldn't do anything to the track after the last test there?

    http://espn.go.com/rpm/irl/2003/0804/1590080.html

    Sounds like maybe he was mistaken................
    SENسR MODERATOR......

    "Better To Be Judged By Twelve Than Carried By Six"
    " Only Those Who Will Risk Going Too Far....Can Possibly Find Out How Far One Can Go "...T.S. Elliot....

  • #2
    will they have to crank up the wing angles to make it workable this year dog?

    Damm shame really, nice facility, crappy track.
    "Living well is the best revenge"

    George Herbert

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    • #3
      They seem to have this problem every other year. It is the crappy weather here... lots of freezing and thawing and re-freezing going on.
      One driver's "fuel strategy" is another driver's "speed up or we will park you!"

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      • #4
        the freeze/thaw cycle is pretty standard here in the midwest, the original track bed at Kentucky is apparently somewhat suspect considering it is effected more than the other tracks in this part of the country.
        "Living well is the best revenge"

        George Herbert

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        • #5
          I like think I know a bit about pavement, and one thing I have noticed over the past few years with all the new tracks out there...the inability to compact the pavement like tracks that are 30+ years old. It comes from simply a lack of track time and the few number of races that have taken place at the tracks...

          For example, when they pave a highway, or regular road, the grip comes rather quickly because cars are driving on it 24/7 from the moment it's done. That way, all the excess, and marbles that come from a pave job are washed or kicked away within a week or so. Likewise, the "groove" in each of the lanes is defined rather quickly...even a regular road has a groove, it's hard to see, but it's there. If you don't race on the track, you'll never compact it in a manner to allow good racing, and sustain life of the asphalt itself, the base, and the subbase....it's a science, and everybody is getting a huge learning experience about pavement from the 1990's "track boom."
          Doctorindy.com

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Railbird
            will they have to crank up the wing angles to make it workable this year dog?

            Damm shame really, nice facility, crappy track.
            I don't think so poo bah. I just think the shock guys will get in some overtime this race.
            SENسR MODERATOR......

            "Better To Be Judged By Twelve Than Carried By Six"
            " Only Those Who Will Risk Going Too Far....Can Possibly Find Out How Far One Can Go "...T.S. Elliot....

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Railbird
              the freeze/thaw cycle is pretty standard here in the midwest, the original track bed at Kentucky is apparently somewhat suspect considering it is effected more than the other tracks in this part of the country.
              I think that they have an additional drainage problem that possibly the other track builders accounted for.
              One driver's "fuel strategy" is another driver's "speed up or we will park you!"

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              • #8
                Originally posted by BlueStang
                I think that they have an additional drainage problem that possibly the other track builders accounted for.
                I think we have a winner, here!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Doctorindy
                  It comes from simply a lack of track time and the few number of races that have taken place at the tracks...
                  Ford conducts open WC & BGN tests on the track every Tuesday for their teams... not sure if that's anywhere near as beneficial as an actual race, but it sure adds a lot of laps at the place on a weekly basis.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MoparsRule
                    Ford conducts open WC & BGN tests on the track every Tuesday for their teams... not sure if that's anywhere near as beneficial as an actual race, but it sure adds a lot of laps at the place on a weekly basis.
                    That would help, but it probably just isn't enough, plus there's only a handfull of cars on the track during those tests, not 43...

                    ..oh well...it just takes time...
                    Doctorindy.com

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                    • #11
                      Take it from someone that had a house built within 15 miles of where the track is, back in 1972 (Erlanger). The soil there, actually the stickiest, most dense clay I have ever seen, is the problem. My kids were under five then, we occupied in the spring, before the sod and seed work was done, and that wasn't done until the end of the summer, they had to be kept out of that stuff when it was wet because if you had to go in after them, you got taller with every step. The stuff wouldn't even make a good dirt track, as a base for a race track, it would be hopeless. They would have had to scrape the top layer down an unreasonable amount to find anything suitable for a base. The track may never be stable.

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                      • #12
                        We will not spare any expense to make sure that the driver is safe and feels comfortable in the car," Cassis said.

                        http://www.courier-journal.com/cjspo...0805-3421.html

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                        • #13
                          I'll have to say mackie looks right on this one. The winters can't be as harsh as in Michigan or Milwaukee and both tracks before they were repaved never had bumps or indentations that I recall. They both featured cracks in the asphalt surface which were filled and the cars would have to deal with bottoming out.
                          "You can't arrest those guys, they're folk heroes"
                          "They're criminals"
                          "Well most folk heroes started out as criminals"

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                          • #14
                            Z28,
                            Actually, the fact that they are not as harsh actually makes it worse. Up North, stuff freezes, and stays that way for a while. Down here, normally, stuff freezes, then thaws. The water from the snow/ice melt gets into cracks, where it freezes again... and the whole thing repeats... over and over.

                            Also, the precip often starts as rain, then switches over. So, the original rain gets into things before freezing.

                            Then, you add in the drainage issue (which might be fixed by now), and what Mackie said about the clay, and you have a big mess.

                            This past Winter was a little odd in that we did have an extended period of below-freezing weather, but we had our share of wet precip changing over to ice, too.
                            One driver's "fuel strategy" is another driver's "speed up or we will park you!"

                            Comment

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