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Racing on the margin

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  • Racing on the margin

    When racing on the margin replaces racing on the cushion.Take a gander at this insight from Mr Powell (I've resisted the temptation:>)et all.
    I think the IRL needs to find drastic ways to slip under the wire if it wants to take advantage of big track down time.The only other alternative is the season ticket squeeze play, not a pretty sight.


    carl s
    Indio, CA

    [ January 16, 2002: Message edited by: carl s ]
    Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

  • #2
    LVMS is a special issue, on both the positive and negative side. I would guess that the cost of the land required to build the track was less per acre then any track built in the last ten years. They also have enough space for a auto related Industrial Park. They have more then a dozen stand-alone racing venues on the property that don't require massive amounts of money to operate. There are major events that do well besides NASCAR, such as the NHRA and World of Outlaws, each with two events a year. These venues weren't that costly to build, being under the umbrella of the overall property, and having some shared parking helps.

    Remember that Speedway Motorsports wasn't the builder, they bought at what I assume was a "distressed" price.

    On the other hand, there is the problem of getting the fans off the tables and slot machines of "The Strip," NASCAR can do it, the NHRA can, with Vegas as close to Southern California as it is. The WoO events are linked to the SEMA show in the Spring, and coupled with NASCAR in the Fall. The IRL hasn't been able to do it yet, mostly do to the fact that, as an emerging series, the drivers have not become household names. Two more seasons as exciting as 2001, coupled with more defections from CART and it will be time for the series to take another shot at LVMS.

    I'll say one thing, looking at the property from I-15 when there is nothing going on there, with the terain being what it is, it doesn't look all that impressive, but it gets the job done. Profitable? I guess, you don't hear Bruton b****ing about not having a second WC date the way he does at Texas. With two IRL races a year putting on the show they do there each year, maybe he won't need the second date anyway.

    Comment


    • #3
      Remember that Speedway Motorsports wasn't the builder, they bought at what I assume was a "distressed" price.
      As one of the people that involved in building and managing the track originally, I can say with cetainty that Bruton paid top dollar for LVMS. At the time it was sold, there was a bidding war between SMI and ISC. Bruton won at far more than a "distressed" price.

      I can also tell you that much of what Powell says in the article is posturing. When we ran the track we ran IRL events and they were profitable... not sellouts by any means, but profitable just the same. If the track is being properly managed, the breakeven point for the Superspeedway events should be about 35,000 ticket sales. That's a number that should be able to be attained here on a regular basis.

      However, the sales and marketing personnel that Powell has installed have shown minimal ability to sell anything except Winston Cup tickets and sponsorships because those are the easy sell. Their sales in other areas are dismal, both in terms of effort and results.


      [ January 16, 2002: Message edited by: Fueler ]

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Fueler:
        <STRONG>

        ...However, the sales and marketing personnel that Powell has installed have shown minimal ability to sell anything except Winston Cup tickets and sponsorships because those are the easy sell. Their sales in other areas are dismal, both in terms of effort and results...


        [ January 16, 2002: Message edited by: Fueler ]</STRONG>
        I found it interesting (and distressing) that as I went to the last IRL race at LVMS, I was driving through town and saw a billboard sign for the speedway advertising the NHRA event, which had been held three weeks earlier! I'm not sure who's responsibilty it was to promote the event, but it was obvious that NHRA was higher on somebody's list of importance. I mean, nobody even bothered to change the sign!

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        • #5
          The IRL needs to do the "stunt" marketing in Las Vegas. Cheever needs to drive down the "strip", Sigfried & Roy need to make a white tiger turn into an IRL car on stage, give away an outdated 2000 Dallara on a dollar slot jackpot, win rides in the two- seater, etc, etc. You have to remember that Vegas is an "over the top" marketing gimmick. The same old promotional stuff won't work there.
          Have attended: Indy 500 (36), Belle Island (3), Kentucky (4), St Pete (3), Homestead (1), Texas (2) Michigan (5), Cleveland (3), Iowa (6), Chicagoland (5), IRP (2), Eldora (3)...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Fueler:
            <STRONG>

            As one of the people that involved in building and managing the track originally, I can say with cetainty that Bruton paid top dollar for LVMS. At the time it was sold, there was a bidding war between SMI and ISC. Bruton won at far more than a "distressed" price. </STRONG>
            Sorry fueler, I forgot about the bidding war. One other thing I failed to mention is that despite the desert setting, LVMS looks as impressive as can be when sold out for a NASCAR WC date. I only hope the day will come that the IRL can return.

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            • #7
              Sorry,
              I left out the link.
              Here it is

              http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/st...512892467.html
              Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

              Comment

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