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My Own Suggestions to NHRA

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  • My Own Suggestions to NHRA

    Since I am powerless to change anything the NHRA rules committee is enforcing, here is my suggestion although they will not be implemented.

    1. Limit the top fuel and funny car h/p so they can run the proper 1/4 mile.

    2. Have the pro stock rules changed so that the actual cars vs. pseudo funny cars compete. I would be OK with what the manufactures are producing with supercharging engines and then coming up with some rules equalizing the cars.

  • #2
    If a track has enough runoff for 1/4 mile, run 1/4 mile. If it doesn't (like in Pomona) then run 1000 ft. You already run 4 abreast races. You can do this too. Aside from that, not sure what else to do. Economics of nitro racing seem to be a problem in that the leakers are mostly out of the sport as there's no match races or smaller events to cater to. That or they're just genuinely bad at promoting themselves and creating package deals to make side cash. IHRA is out of that game but maybe as a sanctioning body, it's time to step up and do something for those guys.

    Pro Stock needs a massive change - changes to engine rules, introducing direct competition from Mountain Motors Pro Stock, something. Pro Mod, on the other hand, is red hot. It should be your third class that you promote. They're fast, they look cool, they get press and TV time outside of national events.

    Introduce Nostalgia nitro for national events.

    Bring back Fuel Altered.

    All those little classes that run national events? Move a chunk of eliminations to Saturday and Friday.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Jag-lover View Post
      Since I am powerless to change anything the NHRA rules committee is enforcing, here is my suggestion although they will not be implemented.

      1. Limit the top fuel and funny car h/p so they can run the proper 1/4 mile.

      2. Have the pro stock rules changed so that the actual cars vs. pseudo funny cars compete. I would be OK with what the manufactures are producing with supercharging engines and then coming up with some rules equalizing the cars.
      If I may expand on your very good suggestions....
      1. Top Fuel and Funny Car should basically go back to their circa 1990 specifications, but with safety updates. Smaller, lighter cars with a lot less fuel flow and downforce. The cars were going 4.80s and were a couple years from breaking the 300 MPH barrier, and the racing was in the quarter-mile and exciting.
      2. NHRA should replace the current Pro Stock with Factory Stock Showdown. High seven-second production-based cars featuring always entertaining wheelies.
      3. NHRA needs to returned to tape-delayed highlights shows for their national event coverage. IMHO the positives of live coverage do not outweigh the negatives, unless they tighten up the support racing and show the between-rounds action.
      “America is all about speed. Hot, nasty, badass speed.” - Eleanor Roosevelt

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      • #4
        I was a casual NHRA fan right up until they went to 1000'

        That just turned me off immediately and I almost never watch now.

        When I do see it on TV I find I never heard of many of those entered these days.

        Casual fan to not a fan at all over night.

        Slow 'em down and bring back the 1/4 mile whenever and where ever possible.

        Theyre going as fast now as they were back then. That couple hundred feet of cool down lane probably wont make any difference if something goes terribly wrong these days


        Live like Dave

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        • #5
          320 feet is so much space that a street car with big brakes and tires can stop from 100 miles per hour. It's only small when compared to the overall task of getting a blown nitro car stopped.
          Last edited by atrackforumfan; 01-22-2020, 11:03 AM.
          Racing ain't much, but workin's nothing. Richard Tharp

          Lying was a no-brainer for me. Robin Miller

          "I thought they booed [Danica] because she was being a complete jerk, but then they applauded for A.J. Foyt. Now I'm just confused."

          The real world sucks. Ed McCullough

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          • #6
            Question: Will slowing the cars down in any way make it easier for small budget teams to make ends meet? From what I understand, the economics of racing national events for those squads was such at the time when there were appreciably more nitro cars was never good, and that they made ends meet running races on the off weeks. If there are no off week races anywhere, then does anything change?

            Seems to me fans will notice when the win lights come on and the top speed is in the 280s or 290s instead of the 330s.Will be even more glaring as the Pro Mod guys keep getting faster and faster.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by VirtualBalboa View Post
              Question: Will slowing the cars down in any way make it easier for small budget teams to make ends meet? From what I understand, the economics of racing national events for those squads was such at the time when there were appreciably more nitro cars was never good, and that they made ends meet running races on the off weeks. If there are no off week races anywhere, then does anything change?

              Seems to me fans will notice when the win lights come on and the top speed is in the 280s or 290s instead of the 330s.Will be even more glaring as the Pro Mod guys keep getting faster and faster.
              In theory, yes. But it all depends on how they would slow the cars down. Slower cars SHOULD be less stressful on equipment, but if they require large capital investments in new equipment to comply, it will be hard.

              Having no insight into the economics of running a professional-level drag racing time, or running nitro, I wonder if having a cap on the number of engines a team can run during a season would have the effect of slowing the cars down, as you're less likely to lean on a motor if you only have say eight motors for the season, and if you run out you either pay a big penalty to run additional motors or you're just done.
              “America is all about speed. Hot, nasty, badass speed.” - Eleanor Roosevelt

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Sweaty Teddy View Post

                In theory, yes. But it all depends on how they would slow the cars down. Slower cars SHOULD be less stressful on equipment, but if they require large capital investments in new equipment to comply, it will be hard.
                Seems like restricting fuel flow would be a way to do this, but would require new equipment and who-knows-what to police it. Again, it's a bit like "what if they were qualifying at 185 for the Indy 500 this year?" Easy to speculate that nothing would change, but tough for me to believe it.

                Having no insight into the economics of running a professional-level drag racing time, or running nitro, I wonder if having a cap on the number of engines a team can run during a season would have the effect of slowing the cars down, as you're less likely to lean on a motor if you only have say eight motors for the season, and if you run out you either pay a big penalty to run additional motors or you're just done.
                The more I've looked into this, the more I realize how different drag racing's business is vs. that of other motorsports. Well into the 1990s, the teams running the top classes continued to perform in front of big crowds outside national events, those in turn being split between NHRA and IHRA (with competitors being in both simultaneously most of the time). There's a real barnstorming aspect to it, and we still see some examples of this like the Northern Nationals and World Series of Drag Racing. But those events are fewer and far between today than they were 20 years ago. I think a big part of that is the NHRA itself contractually obligates all major sponsored teams to appear at every race, and there's 24 of them covering half the year and most of the summer. Yeah, reducing the amount of oil downs would be good, but how do you penalize the teams? Force them out of elimination rounds?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by VirtualBalboa View Post

                  Seems like restricting fuel flow would be a way to do this, but would require new equipment and who-knows-what to police it. Again, it's a bit like "what if they were qualifying at 185 for the Indy 500 this year?" Easy to speculate that nothing would change, but tough for me to believe it.
                  Restricting fuel flow is actually pretty easy, as it is how they manage performance in some of the nostalgia series. Mandate a particular single fuel pump, and seal it. Break the seal and you're disqualified. Alternately, randomly distribute sealed fuel pumps at the beginning of each national event, and collect them when a given car is done competing.


                  The more I've looked into this, the more I realize how different drag racing's business is vs. that of other motorsports. Well into the 1990s, the teams running the top classes continued to perform in front of big crowds outside national events, those in turn being split between NHRA and IHRA (with competitors being in both simultaneously most of the time). There's a real barnstorming aspect to it, and we still see some examples of this like the Northern Nationals and World Series of Drag Racing. But those events are fewer and far between today than they were 20 years ago. I think a big part of that is the NHRA itself contractually obligates all major sponsored teams to appear at every race, and there's 24 of them covering half the year and most of the summer. Yeah, reducing the amount of oil downs would be good, but how do you penalize the teams? Force them out of elimination rounds?
                  Back in NHRA was 8-10 events and IHRA was something similar, there were off weekends for match racing. Now with 24 events, there aren't many off weekends anymore. For a while they had oildown limits, and teams were fined and docked points for too many oildowns, but I believe they got rid of them after too many complaints from the more powerful owners. I'd say you get one engine per event, and if you break you're done.
                  “America is all about speed. Hot, nasty, badass speed.” - Eleanor Roosevelt

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