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Where are all the 1st gen IRL cars?

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  • Where are all the 1st gen IRL cars?

    I remember browsing race car ad sites and seeing them going for very attractive prices like this rolling chassis for instance. $15,000!
    http://www.race-cars.com/carsold/oth...63240891ss.htm
    They never ran on road courses but no reason they couldn't, right? No refueling location to worry about in a vintage race and if original Aurora V8s are scarce you could plug in a hot rodded Northstar and run race gasoline and etc. They had short oval aero packages did they not?
    IDK just musing1997 Dallara IRL.jpg

  • #2
    At vintage races. Sometimes they drop, I think, small block Chevy or other non-original in them. I’ve seen a variety.
    But, hey, the guys are out there running them and having fun in an economical, simplified and quick enough to get your heart rate racing car.

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    • #3
      The question is very much, why would you want to? They are boring spec formula cars, the most interesting thing about them will be the livery and decals they wear.

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      • #4
        Why? You get to put down speedy laps at the great tracks all over the country.
        From what I have seen many of these guys often enough seem to be budgeteers when compared to some of the other entries, they don’t worry about the livery too much.

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        • #5
          I've seen a lot of videos recently about conversions of old US open wheel cars - someone actually made a 00 Lola into a street car with a plate in one. Takes some effort with the engines being a stressed member and building some sort of containment to drop in an LS or whatever (one guy is planning to swap in a 4-rotor into a CART chassis that I saw!), but it can clearly be done.

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          • #6
            That new Corvette engine would go and sound right.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Michael Ferner View Post
              The question is very much, why would you want to? They are boring spec formula cars, the most interesting thing about them will be the livery and decals they wear.
              Aren't all open wheel cars since IDK way back spec cars? Even today and these new Indy cars have a phone booth for a cockpit. There I said it.

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              • #8
                Some of the first/second generation IRL cars went to the AIS series (American IndyCar Series). I think the Indy Racing Experience also acquired several...but the engines were changed out to easily serviceable/gas engines. Also I have seen one or two at the SVRA event.

                I think quite a few 1st-Gen cars were converted into show cars, and I want to say they enjoyed a fairly long life as (non-running/no engine) show cars for teams/etc. I recall seeing 1st-Gen/2nd-Gen cars still being used as show cars late as 2011...coinciding with when the Dallara IR-03/05's (3rd-Gen cars) were still racing on the track. I suppose to the layman, the appearances/differences were "close enough" it could still pass as a show car.
                Doctorindy.com

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                • #9
                  Not surprised where this thread went.
                  “Church supper with grandma and granddad, lets go out and have ourselves the best time we ever had" - John Mellencamp

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                  • #10
                    Didn't those cars have a dreadful reputation because of being so tail heavy (due to a cheap but oversized heavy gearbox) that they were unstable and swap ends instantly once you lost control?

                    If so, that's one good reason to think twice about running one nowadays.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Indyote View Post
                      Didn't those cars have a dreadful reputation because of being so tail heavy (due to a cheap but oversized heavy gearbox) that they were unstable and swap ends instantly once you lost control?

                      If so, that's one good reason to think twice about running one nowadays.
                      IDK sounds like a Porsche 911 Turbo from the 80's and 90's. The gearbox location certainly did transmit impact to the driver on ovals but that shouldn't be a concern at a vintage road course event.

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                      • #12
                        I think a couple might’ve been converted into Pikes Peak specials!
                        "Charging a man with murder here was like handing out speeding tickets at the Indy 500."- Capt. Willard, Apocolypse Now
                        "Ain't nuthin' like [being with a woman], 'cept maybe the Indy 500."- Bunny, Platoon
                        "To alcohol! The cause of- and solution to- all of life's problems."- Homer J. Simpson

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                        • #13
                          First generation IRL cars used an Emco gearbox. It was rather large but the big issue was it was an H pattern box when all other top tier open wheel cars were sequential. Also they did not have differentials.
                          Absolutely no parts interchange between the race Aurora (and later Chevrolet) race engines and the street version. They will not "just bolt in".
                          While they did have short oval aero kits available the suspension is still offset. It is very difficult/impossible to get proper camber.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by goner View Post
                            Why? You get to put down speedy laps at the great tracks all over the country.
                            From what I have seen many of these guys often enough seem to be budgeteers when compared to some of the other entries, they don’t worry about the livery too much.
                            Absolutely. I've also seen them at historic meets, some have paint jobs that you would recognize, some don't. I don't know what engines are in them, I'm sure it's a mixed bag, and it must take some fabrication to make any choice other than the spec of the time work. Heck, I'd go for the Cosworth DFX package that is readily available to vintage campaigners. And yes, they look like they turn right just fine.
                            I live my life 4.048 miles at a time.

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                            • #15
                              Actually the original motors are not that hard to get and are usually much more reasonably priced than practically anything else.

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