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Indy 500 Results Unofficial Until the Following Morning

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  • Indy 500 Results Unofficial Until the Following Morning

    For many years, results of the Indianapolis 500 were considered unofficial until the official results were posted the following morning. What year did that change with official results being released on the same day as the race?

  • #2
    I am guessing whenever electronic scoring made it rather pointless.

    Right about the time they gave USAC the boot.
    Where are the Indy 500 winning cars? Visit -> http://inrd.gotdns.com/indystuff/

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    • #3
      1992 was the last year that official results were posted the next morning at 8 a.m.
      https://www.newspapers.com/clip/81914369/

      Beginning in 1993, the official results were to be posted "six hours after the the end the race".
      https://www.newspapers.com/clip/13575939/
      Doctorindy.com

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      • #4
        Thanks!

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        • #5
          1990 was the first year to use the DATA-1 computerizes timing and scoring system....with the transponders and the antennas in the pavement. I think they may have experimented with it during 1989, but the 1990 race was the first year they utilized it as a fully-operation primary T&S. It worked brilliant...on an IBM OS-II computer....until the printer ran out of paper. Sometime after the halfway point, the T&S froze. It was still computing and saving the data, but it wasn't accessible and displaying. It forced the T&S crew to revert to clipboards for the rest of the race. The 1990 race was a fairly easy race to score, and no problems were encountered.

          After the race, they were able to download the remainder of the data, and only had to make one correction. I think they had Brayton and Cheever swapped for 7th-8th, as they missed a lap in there somewhere. But it was a remarkably easy post-race analysis. After years of going late into the night, or sometimes pulling all-nighters, this was the first time they were wrapped up and "going home in time for dinner". As they system improved over the next couple of years, it was clear they no longer needed the night, and 6 hours was plenty of time.

          Also, I think the six hours is the guide, and if they're done earlier, they'll release when they're ready. So it's perhaps better described as...official results posted 'no more than six hours after the race'.
          Doctorindy.com

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Doctorindy View Post
            1990 was the first year to use the DATA-1 computerizes timing and scoring system....with the transponders and the antennas in the pavement. I think they may have experimented with it during 1989, but the 1990 race was the first year they utilized it as a fully-operation primary T&S. It worked brilliant...on an IBM OS-II computer....until the printer ran out of paper. Sometime after the halfway point, the T&S froze. It was still computing and saving the data, but it wasn't accessible and displaying. It forced the T&S crew to revert to clipboards for the rest of the race. The 1990 race was a fairly easy race to score, and no problems were encountered.

            After the race, they were able to download the remainder of the data, and only had to make one correction. I think they had Brayton and Cheever swapped for 7th-8th, as they missed a lap in there somewhere. But it was a remarkably easy post-race analysis. After years of going late into the night, or sometimes pulling all-nighters, this was the first time they were wrapped up and "going home in time for dinner". As they system improved over the next couple of years, it was clear they no longer needed the night, and 6 hours was plenty of time.

            Also, I think the six hours is the guide, and if they're done earlier, they'll release when they're ready. So it's perhaps better described as...official results posted 'no more than six hours after the race'.
            I wonder how long they continued to have a manual back up for scoring, or what backup exists today? I work for several tracks/organizations that have computerized scoring. Nearly all of them have a manual backup in case of a computer failure.
            "For in the final analysis, our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this small planet. We all breathe the same air, we all cherish our children's future, and we are all mortal".

            John Kennedy at American University 1963

            "Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power"

            A. Lincoln

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            • #7
              Not Indy, but I remember that Cleveland was one of the last manual scored races, it took them a while longer to figure out how to do the electronic scoring without messing with the runways
              Where are the Indy 500 winning cars? Visit -> http://inrd.gotdns.com/indystuff/

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Belanger99 View Post

                I work for several tracks/organizations that have computerized scoring. Nearly all of them have a manual backup in case of a computer failure.
                What types of manual backups do they have? I suppose the simplest would be a video camera pointed at the start/finish line. It would take a while, but you could reconstruct the entire race.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Doctorindy View Post
                  . I think they may have experimented with it during 1989, but the 1990 race was the first year they utilized it as a fully-operation primary T&S.
                  All 33 cars did have electronic scoring in 1989. But as you say it more of a test than anything else. I remember USAC Timing and Scoring coming around on race morning and running a loop antenna under our sidepod (where we had mounted their transponder) to make sure that everything was working and that our car was properly identified. This was early in the morning just after we had put Vogler's car in the pits.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bobcat00 View Post

                    What types of manual backups do they have? I suppose the simplest would be a video camera pointed at the start/finish line. It would take a while, but you could reconstruct the entire race.
                    I think NASCAR still does this. At least it did a few years ago. TV camera at race control, and a flip-card timing board clicking off each second. Shoot wide enough to get cars crossing the pit lane and the track, and you're good with a backup as long as you don't run out of tape.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PaddockMoose View Post
                      Not Indy, but I remember that Cleveland was one of the last manual scored races, it took them a while longer to figure out how to do the electronic scoring without messing with the runways
                      IIRC, they couldn’t get approval to install the antennas in the runway, and utilized the older, but reliable electric eye for Cleveland.
                      Doctorindy.com

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by indyrjc View Post

                        All 33 cars did have electronic scoring in 1989. But as you say it more of a test than anything else. I remember USAC Timing and Scoring coming around on race morning and running a loop antenna under our sidepod (where we had mounted their transponder) to make sure that everything was working and that our car was properly identified. This was early in the morning just after we had put Vogler's car in the pits.
                        For some reason I thought that I saw they mounted the transponders in the nose in 1989 and 1990…before they standardized the placement (in the sidepod) by 1991. Or at least some cars had them in the nose. Maybe not.

                        Mounting in the nose back then would be a pain because of difficulty of access. And those old transponders weren’t super small. There probably wasn’t adequate room. Mounting in the sidepod allowed ease of access and sufficient room…plus it made cars equal, relative to the placement….

                        ….except that is for the Galmer. The whole story about the Galmer not having room for it in 1992 led to Al and Danny carrying theirs in the nose….and how the ‘92 margin of victory is closer than published.
                        Last edited by Doctorindy; Today, 12:16 AM.
                        Doctorindy.com

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bobcat00 View Post

                          What types of manual backups do they have? I suppose the simplest would be a video camera pointed at the start/finish line. It would take a while, but you could reconstruct the entire race.
                          Only one that I work for uses a camera at the s/f line.
                          "For in the final analysis, our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this small planet. We all breathe the same air, we all cherish our children's future, and we are all mortal".

                          John Kennedy at American University 1963

                          "Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power"

                          A. Lincoln

                          Comment

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