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1966 Fuji 200

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  • 1966 Fuji 200

    I was browsing the youtube and found this little documentary about the Fuji Speedway and the infamous "Daichi" corner.
    It was infamous because the Daichi was a 200mph banking (similar to Monza) but dropped like the corkscrew.
    USAC raced there in 1966 (as an exhibition) but raced the opposite way, negating the full impact of the Daichi corner.
    There is a short race at the end of the video showing how it might have been.
    Does anyone know if there is any video of the '66 USAC race?
    Rest in peace, Dan Wheldon 1978 - 2011

  • #2
    Here is the result from the '66 Fuji 200.
    Look at the names on this list!
    Only 22 started out of 32 cars.
    Only 2 cars on the lead lap at the end.

    https://www.racing-reference.info/ra...lts/1966-04/X/
    Rest in peace, Dan Wheldon 1978 - 2011

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    • #3
      Why were there so many DNSs, all seemingly due to rods and bearings issues?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Norman J Crump View Post
        Why were there so many DNSs, all seemingly due to rods and bearings issues?
        I wonder if those cars never made it to Japan.

        Rest in peace, Dan Wheldon 1978 - 2011

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        • #5
          Originally posted by raskav View Post

          I wonder if those cars never made it to Japan.
          Scheduled cars and drivers made the trip. Drivers flew to Japan via charter. They boarded the plane in Indianapolis or during the flight's stop on the West Coast. Though tightly budgeted, the race boasted big money for its time, making it attractive to teams. What was in short supply at Fuji, like at other races held in the U.S., was the amount of spare parts on hand. By weight, you might have more potatoes in your pantry than the load of spares each team had available in Japan. (Spares at Fuji also included tools.) Nearly all of the teams were unprepared for what awaited them because many USACers didn't understand road racing and were suspicious of it. It was no surprise, therefore, when many said upon arrival that they were unimpressed by the circuit. A lot of cars were rendered hors de combat due to crashes, the cars being unable to make it around one of Fuji's turns at speed due to their being configured for oval track racing. Others cars suffered terminal engine problems as a result of their oval setups. The number of finishers on the lead lap was consistent with other USAC Champ Car races held during 1966.
          Last edited by editor; 07-17-2021, 04:51 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Norman J Crump View Post
            Why were there so many DNSs, all seemingly due to rods and bearings issues?
            In reading up on the racetrack, the race was run counter clockwise.This was done to reduce speed in a corner off a 200mph straight. At the time the oil pickup was setup for left hand turns. But the right hand turns , created oil pickup problems ,thus bearings and rod issues from oil starvation. Also teams were limited to the amount of equipment do space and cost. When a car broke it was done for the race. Sports Illustrated Vault has article on this race

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            • #7
              I'm intrigued how a right hand turn every other mile can cause such oil pickup problems. Can you describe how "the oil pickup was set up for left hand turns"? Did they relocate the scavenging pump, and remove all baffles? Was that done on the Fords, or the Offies? Supercharged, turbocharged, unblown all the same? And how were they able to race at IRP? Please explain.

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