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Steve Krisiloff is 75 years old today (7/7/21)

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  • Steve Krisiloff is 75 years old today (7/7/21)

    Here's a picture from 1971, which was 50 years ago:


    indy_1971.jpg

  • #2
    THe pride of PArisipany NEw JErsey. HE married well

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    • #3
      Shares a birthday with Tom Kristensen, Ringo Starr, Shelley Duvall...and my wife.
      You've worked so hard on the kidney. Very special -- the kidney has a very special place in the heart. It's an incredible thing. Donald John Trump

      Brian's Wish * Jason Foundation

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      • #4
        Wow. Time waits for no one.

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        • #5
          Damn. The gang has gotten old.
          ...---...

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          • #6
            He looks like Adam Driver.
            http://www.honorflight.org/

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            • #7
              Originally posted by RacingPortaJohn View Post
              He looks like Adam Driver.
              He does, now that you mention it.
              "Only a fool fights in a burning house."-Kang

              "If you listen to fools....The Maaahhhhb Ruuuules....."-Ronnie James Dio

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              • #8
                Steve ran Dayton Speedway in a sprint car with no roll cage. Not too many guys left that can say they did that. krisiloff.JPG

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                • #9
                  Back when I would play "USAC Auto Racing" and run full seasons (c'mon, someone else here did that too) Steve and Spike Gehlhausen were my teammates.
                  You've worked so hard on the kidney. Very special -- the kidney has a very special place in the heart. It's an incredible thing. Donald John Trump

                  Brian's Wish * Jason Foundation

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Jamski View Post
                    Back when I would play "USAC Auto Racing" and run full seasons (c'mon, someone else here did that too) Steve and Spike Gehlhausen were my teammates.
                    I never had the board game, but would regularly have races in my sand box. Me, being Gary Bettenhausen would of course win all the races.

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                    • #11
                      Sorry, but I was AJ Foyt and I beat all of ya.
                      "Only a fool fights in a burning house."-Kang

                      "If you listen to fools....The Maaahhhhb Ruuuules....."-Ronnie James Dio

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by TommyTipover View Post
                        Steve ran Dayton Speedway in a sprint car with no roll cage. Not too many guys left that can say they did that.
                        My father and Steve's father were members of the Jersey Sports Car Club. Once Steve started racing Indy cars, we started going to the races at Trenton, Pocono, Indy, and Ontario. My father went to Phoenix and I think Michigan. I was supposed to go to Phoenix one year, but the race was canceled due to flooding.

                        Anyway, I was just poking around and found this article written by Steve in 1971:


                        FROM NOWHERE TO INDY!
                        Steve Krisiloff, Kid From Parisppany, Got Urge To Drive Cars At An Early Age

                        By STEVE KRISILOFF
                        KOKOMO TRIBUNE Tuesday, May 25, 1971

                        INDIANAPOLIS (AP) -- How did a kid named Krisiloff, from a town with a name like Parsippany, wind up racing fast automobiles and having a darned good shot at winning the Indianapolis 500?

                        Parsippany is a self-contained small town not far from Newark, N.J., across the river from New York City. But unlike some other towns near New York, Parsippany doesn't depend on the big city next door for its existence.

                        Parsippany is an Indian name, though I don't know whether it came from a tribe or from some big chief. Krisiloff is Russian. My grandparents came from Russia.

                        My father, Mike, an accountant by profession, was a sports car addict when I was in grade school and at one time he owned the most beautiful Jaguar you ever saw. He wanted to be a race driver and he talked about it from the time I can remember. I guess that's where I got the urge.

                        So it was more or less with the family's blessings that I started racing go-karts in 1959, when I was 13, running them around the high school football field or at little tracks some people set up for us kids. I was good at it, too, and got more than 100 trophies over the next four years to show for it.

                        I finished grade and high school in Parsippany, all the time moving gradually into driving sports cars and later, sprint cars for United Racing Club (URC) in the East.

                        In between, I took courses at Rippon College and at the University of Miami. But I guess education was secondary to racing.

                        I drove for the Jersey Sports Car Club in 1962 and won several class and hill climb events.

                        In 1964 I joined the Sports Car Owners and Drivers Association and won the SCODA championship that year and again in 1966.

                        Sports cars are fun, and a kid can really learn to drive in them. But you don't make money going for class wins, Indy and money, after all, is the object of it all. I wanted to be a professional like my idols Mario Andretti and Mark Donohue. So I moved up to the fast sprint cars in 1967.

                        You really learn what racing is all about in these little bombs. That season, I finished second in the URC point standings, won the Trenton 100 National Open for super-modified cars, and was named "Rookie of the Year."

                        All along, however, I had my eye on the big championship cars -- the Indianapolis cars -- of the United States Auto Club. But USAC car owners are like the people from Missouri, you have to show them what you can do.

                        Many of these owners also race sprint cars, so I switched to the USAC sprint division hoping to catch somebody's eye. I raced in eight features and finished so far down the list in point standings -- 31st, to be exact -- that nobody came knocking at my door.

                        I was still only 22 years old, but I figured it was time to beard the lion in his own den, so to speak, and give Indy a trial.

                        My father and I purchased a Gerhardt chassis that had seen its best years. We did all the work on it, and we raced it for the first time at Langhorne, Pa., in 1969. We didn't set the woods on fire, of course. I stayed out of everybody's way and finished 12th.

                        We brought the car to Indy in 1970, on a shoestring, really. But I passed my rookie test in it and qualified for the race at 162.448 m.p.h. -- the fastest I'd ever gone in any kind of car -- and then I was bumped from the field by a faster car.

                        My old Gerhardt had been driven by some pretty good pilots before we latched on to it. People like Mel Kenyon, George Snider, Bob Harkey and Denny Zimmerman. Look at the starting iineup of this year's race and you'll see their names right in there. So, I got some pretty good training in the old car.

                        So that's how I got to Indianapolis. And I'm back again this year, with Andy Granatelli, in a McNamara-Ford that most any 25-year-old driver would give his right arm, well, not literally, to drive. I want to make the most of it.



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