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The small F1 team appreciation thread

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  • #31
    Amazing to me that Chopper Tyrrell got big money from Matra, elf, and Ford with those facilities! Must have not allowed site visits.....😀
    And don't forget the heat!

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    • #32
      Hector Rebaque and his HR100 Lotus 79 clone made by Penske that ran very briefly in 1979 -with him running the private Lotus cars mainly, until packing it in as team owner.

      Where did Hector get his money not many people have the money to buy a Lotus 79 as a private entrant. He had Marlboro small sponsorship on his cars, but no much else.
      And don't forget the heat!

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      • #33
        Originally posted by senorsoupe View Post
        WHo would have thought that one day they would have the best one-off sponsor I can remember?
        CfyqBcQXIAAWJOj?format=jpg&name=medium.jpg

        An undertaker sponsoring Merzario in 1979.
        "An emphasis was placed on drivers with road racing backgrounds which meant drivers from open wheel, oval track racing were at a disadvantage. That led Tony George to create the IRL." -Indy Review 1996

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Openracer View Post
          Hector Rebaque and his HR100 Lotus 79 clone made by Penske that ran very briefly in 1979 -with him running the private Lotus cars mainly, until packing it in as team owner.

          Where did Hector get his money not many people have the money to buy a Lotus 79 as a private entrant. He had Marlboro small sponsorship on his cars, but no much else. [sic]
          Family money. Hector Rebaque's father was wealthy and well-connected. F1 was relatively inexpensive at the time. A privateer could buy a year-old, top-flight F1 car for around £15,000. Historically, teams were anxious to sell pensioned-off cars. They weren't earning their keep and the sellers needed the revenue they generated to fund operations. Sponsorship didn't pay all of the bills.

          A provision of the deal which saw Team Rebaque acquire the first 79 built allowed Lotus to temporarily reclaim the car in time of need.

          In spite of its outward appearance and the use of as many Lotus 79 components as could be repurposed, the Rebaque HR100 was not a clone of the Lotus. There were significant detail and aerodynamic differences between the two cars. Team Rebaque was forced to turn constructor as a result of anti-privateer strictures put into place by FOCA and by the CSI/FISA. The HR100 was hurriedly created to provide the team with its own car. John Barnard, who had gone to work for the Rebaques, would have designed the HR101 had Bernie Ecclestone's maneuverings not brought the team to a sudden end.
          Last edited by editor; 12-23-2020, 06:47 AM.

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          • #35
            Funny how Rebaque responded to Bernie's screwings by...eventually writing him a cheque for his #2 Brabham seat. Well, maybe it was an improvement to one-stop shopping. Also curious how Bernie had a 1st-rate championship contender in one car and a pure rent-a-ride in the other. Rebaque replaced Ricardo Zunino, who I read was from a wealthy Brazilian farming family.
            "Thank God for the fortune to be here, to be an American."--Alan Kulwicki, 11/15/92

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            • #36
              Originally posted by dalz View Post
              Funny how Rebaque responded to Bernie's screwings by...eventually writing him a cheque for his #2 Brabham seat. Well, maybe it was an improvement to one-stop shopping. Also curious how Bernie had a 1st-rate championship contender in one car and a pure rent-a-ride in the other. Rebaque replaced Ricardo Zunino, who I read was from a wealthy Brazilian farming family. [sic]
              There was nothing funny or curious about the Hector Rebaque-Brabham arrangement. Bernie Ecclestone had cast his gaze toward Mexico looking for money; Rebaque helped secure Pemex. Rebaque, who suspected he had unfinished business in F1, considered restarting Team Rebaque before abandoning the idea after considering all of the political and legal machinations that engulfed his and other privateer teams. Parmalat eventually pushed Ecclestone into signing an Italian for the seat.

              At the time, Ecclestone used the second Brabham drive to generate much-needed revenue. The money helped pay Nelson Piquet's wages among other bills. Ecclestone didn't care about the constructor's championship, only the driver's title. Ecclestone wasn't the only team boss who thought that putting a star in one car and a revenue-producer in the other made good business sense. That attitude can still be found today.

              Team Rebaque wasn't the only team and Hector Rebaque wasn't the only driver to suffer from the anti-privateer stance adopted by officialdom. Bernie Ecclestone once was on both sides of the issue when it involved Piquet.
              Last edited by editor; 12-23-2020, 03:27 PM.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by editor View Post

                Family money. Hector Rebaque's father was wealthy and well-connected. F1 was relatively inexpensive at the time. A privateer could buy a year-old, top-flight F1 car for around £15,000. Historically, teams were anxious to sell pensioned-off cars. They weren't earning their keep and the sellers needed the revenue they generated to fund operations. Sponsorship didn't pay all of the bills.

                A provision of the deal which saw Team Rebaque acquire the first 79 built allowed Lotus to temporarily reclaim the car in time of need.

                In spite of its outward appearance and the use of as many Lotus 79 components as could be repurposed, the Rebaque HR100 was not a clone of the Lotus. There were significant detail and aerodynamic differences between the two cars. Team Rebaque was forced to turn constructor as a result of anti-privateer strictures put into place by FOCA and by the CSI/FISA. The HR100 was hurriedly created to provide the team with its own car. John Barnard, who had gone to work for the Rebaques, would have designed the HR101 had Bernie Ecclestone's maneuverings not brought the team to a sudden end.
                Fascinating information, many thanks as always. I probably should have not used the word 'clone', as I meant many teams were trying to copy and/or improve on the Lotus 79. vs. using the actual designs. I had no idea one could buy a car that cheap and that current.

                Interesting about John Barnard and also the anti-privateers. Makes a lot of sense the privateers went away shortly after. Was the last privateer running someone else's prior car - was RAM and the Williams FW07s in 1980? I can't remember another after that. I saw the Keegan and Cogan cars at Watkins Glen in 1980 as a kid and was amazed how much slower they were vs. Saudia Williams. Amazing what the team know how is so valuable to running competitively.
                And don't forget the heat!

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Openracer View Post

                  Fascinating information, many thanks as always. I probably should have not used the word 'clone', as I meant many teams were trying to copy and/or improve on the Lotus 79. vs. using the actual designs. I had no idea one could buy a car that cheap and that current.

                  Interesting about John Barnard and also the anti-privateers. Makes a lot of sense the privateers went away shortly after. Was the last privateer running someone else's prior car - was RAM and the Williams FW07s in 1980? I can't remember another after that. I saw the Keegan and Cogan cars at Watkins Glen in 1980 as a kid and was amazed how much slower they were vs. Saudia Williams. Amazing what the team know how is so valuable to running competitively. [sic]
                  You're welcome.

                  Rupert Keegan is credited as being the last privateer driver to race in F1. He drove a RAM-run Williams in the USGP at Watkins Glen in 1980. Adrian Reynard engineered the car. Geoff Lees replaced Kevin Cogan for that event. Cogan, who had rented a RAM Williams with support from his Aurora F1 team backer Teddy Yip, was dropped after failing to qualify in Canada.

                  The last privateer entry is credited to Onyx. Mike Earle's team fielded a March 821 under the banner of LBT Team March in a handful of European F1 races in 1982. Emilio de Villota did not pre-qualify or did not qualify for any of the events entered.

                  The poor pace of privateers should not be attributed solely to team know-how. IRTS tended to supply privateers with unsuitable wooden tires. It required private teams to run on those tires only. Drivers reported it felt as if they were running on ice. One driver spun nearly a dozen times during a single session while running on the rock-hard tires. Privateers complained they had been fleeced. IRTS was a Bernie Ecclestone company. Ecclestone was intent on turning F1 into a packaged show. FOCA forced privateer teams work on the cars under the most primitive of conditions. Member teams did not have to endure such slights.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by editor View Post

                    You're welcome.

                    Rupert Keegan is credited as being the last privateer driver to race in F1. He drove a RAM-run Williams in the USGP at Watkins Glen in 1980. Adrian Reynard engineered the car. Geoff Lees replaced Kevin Cogan for that event. Cogan, who had rented a RAM Williams with support from his Aurora F1 team backer Teddy Yip, was dropped after failing to qualify in Canada.

                    The last privateer entry is credited to Onyx. Mike Earle's team fielded a March 821 under the banner of LBT Team March in a handful of European F1 races in 1982. Emilio de Villota did not pre-qualify or did not qualify for any of the events entered.

                    The poor pace of privateers should not be attributed solely to team know-how. IRTS tended to supply privateers with unsuitable wooden tires. It required private teams to run on those tires only. Drivers reported it felt as if they were running on ice. One driver spun nearly a dozen times during a single session while running on the rock-hard tires. Privateers complained they had been fleeced. IRTS was a Bernie Ecclestone company. Ecclestone was intent on turning F1 into a packaged show. FOCA forced privateer teams work on the cars under the most primitive of conditions. Member teams did not have to endure such slights.
                    Thanks again - very interesting.

                    Yes, Geoff Lees replaced Cogan, now that you mention.?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftse1.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DOIP.TJqN6283Tb208vimgq1txQHaDF%26pid%3DApi&f=1.jpg

                    the March Villota car was #19 correct?

                    The tires - wow. They had no chance.
                    And don't forget the heat!

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Openracer View Post

                      Thanks again - very interesting.

                      Yes, Geoff Lees replaced Cogan, now that you mention.

                      the March Villota car was #19 correct?

                      The tires - wow. They had no chance. ... [sic]
                      You're welcome.

                      Emilio de Villota's car number was 19 as posted.

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