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  • Originally posted by Indyote View Post


    Thanks for the corrections and insights, not only in reply on my posts but those of others as well.
    You're welcome.

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    • Originally posted by editor View Post

      Tom Walkinshaw had a reputation for playing fast and loose, as many of his drivers, staffers and a plethora of race scrutineers have affirmed. It was either his way or the highway. ,
      And when in the Piranha Club he sort of got found out - he couldn't pull the same sort of thing on his own when you had half-a-dozen others doing it all much better and much more vitriolically. But at the start of 1997 there were reasons to be optimistic about a move to Arrows. Especially remembering how bad McLaren had been in the preceding years so going on a points bonus deal was not necessarily an obvious move.
      "An emphasis was placed on drivers with road racing backgrounds which meant drivers from open wheel, oval track racing were at a disadvantage. That led Tony George to create the IRL." -Indy Review 1996

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      • Originally posted by KevMcNJ View Post

        I remember being proud of the fact that someone who raced at my home track in NJ made it to Indy.
        I felt the same way after watching Gordon Johncock run supermodifieds in the early 60’s at my hometown track, Toledo Speedway...

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        • Originally posted by flatlander_48 View Post

          I felt the same way after watching Gordon Johncock run supermodifieds in the early 60’s at my hometown track, Toledo Speedway...
          Had I grown up going to Reading or Williams Grove on Friday night's instead of Windsor I probably would have been a bit more blase' about it.
          Live like Dave

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          • Originally posted by ensign14 View Post
            And when in the Piranha Club he sort of got found out - he couldn't pull the same sort of thing on his own when you had half-a-dozen others doing it all much better and much more vitriolically. But at the start of 1997 there were reasons to be optimistic about a move to Arrows. Especially remembering how bad McLaren had been in the preceding years so going on a points bonus deal was not necessarily an obvious move.
            If you say so. The view from inside the sport doesn't comport with your opinion.

            The Arrows A18 was an outdated Benetton design brought to Arrows by Frank Dernie. Its aerodynamics were refined in Arrows' antiquated wind tunnel. As the team lacked resources, the A18 was fitted with a lot of parts not intended for it; the car suffered from poor setups for some time. John Barnard deemed the car an unsafe mess. Barnard said the first thing he had to do with the A18 when he took over technical leadership was to make it safe. Perhaps the one good thing that could be said about the chassis was that its balance wasn't bad. Tires turned out to be a plus. Yamaha's tiny, insufficiently stiff engines — from startup to blow up in less than 10 seconds Tyrrell mechanics like to crack — produced little power everywhere except on dynos in Japan. Yamaha showed little understanding of F1 engine needs. Its quality control was poor, leading to additional troubles. It took an all-hands-on-deck effort by staff by Leafield, by EDL and by Yamaha in Japan to get on top of the OX11's maladies.

            Damon Hill said he signed with Arrows because Tom Walkinshaw was willing to pay him what he thought a World Champion should be paid. The decision was based on pragmatism, not optimism, according to Hill. Arrows was just a placeholder for a year.

            Walkinshaw had been exposed long before he tried to become a member of the Piranha Club. Dernie said that Walkinshaw never asked him to cheat, although he added that he likely wouldn't have been asked because he enjoyed talking too much. Dernie said he was irked by Walkinshaw's propensity to spout rampant falsehoods.
            Last edited by editor; 11-19-2020, 03:37 PM.

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            • Originally posted by KevMcNJ View Post

              I remember being proud of the fact that someone who raced at my home track in NJ made it to Indy.
              Sadly my hometown's brightest racing prospect, a rising star named Bertand Fabi, was killed in a testing accident in England in 1986. Sherbrooke is more known for hockey players lol

              Going back to some of what editor has been saying about Tom Walkinshaw, I always thought of him as a sort of wheeler-dealer that was more than happy to work in grey areas or even cross the line to get what he wanted and what editor is saying has confirmed this! My impression is probably forged by Tom's desperate attempts to get his hands on Prost's TV revenue in 2002 by having his friend Chuck Nickerson try to buy the team and enter the old Prost's as "Phoenix F1" in 2002. UnracedF1 has a great article about it, basically some AP04's were fitted with engines from Arrows' 3 seater in the Leafield shop and sent to Kuala Lumpur to be entered. Not entirely sure what Walkinshaw's endgame was, but it was pretty desperate times for him.

              Here is the unracedF1 article for those interested https://www.unracedf1.com/phoenix-gr...iled-f1-entry/ I know we are drifting off topic here but it's a fascinating tale

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              • Originally posted by KevMcNJ View Post

                Had I grown up going to Reading or Williams Grove on Friday night's instead of Windsor I probably would have been a bit more blase' about it.
                I had Alan Kulwicki as a local hero growing up. He was from Greenfield, Wisconsin...which is right next door to my hometown of Greendale (both suburbs of Milwaukee).
                Real drivers don't need fenders!

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