Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Roberto Guerrero

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by DaveL View Post

    I think Cogan gets a bum wrap because of '82. He was actually a pretty good driver.
    Cogan's best drive was at Phoenix in the '86 opener. He and Curry really clicked that day. Larry had some radical Phoenix bias ply tire setup tricks that he had learned from Bobby Unser during Curry's time with Josele Garza. Cogan was pretty dominant in that race.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBv_JhB2B-I


    Comment


    • #17
      Cogan was teammates with Emerson Fittipaldi at Patrick for a time. While Cogan won Phoenix and nearly won Indy, Fittipaldi was still coming on in CART. Then all of the sudden Fittipaldi was winning a lot more and Cogan wasn’t winning. Fittipaldi seemed to take over as the number one driver on the team (plus IIRC, Emerson was integral in getting the Marlboro sponsorship), and I wondered if that was a factor in Cogan sort of being demoted and eventually let go.

      Most probably forget Cogan got to drive an Ilmor Chevy in 1987. But he didn’t have good results at all.
      Doctorindy.com

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by indyrjc View Post

        Larry Curry was Cogan's mechanic in 1986. I talked with Curry at Milwaukee a week later and he told me he blamed himself for not saying anything to Cogan on the last restart. The pace car was way ahead of the field and Curry said he should have told Cogan to get on throttle earlier. As it turned out it was Rahal who basically set the start timing and Cogan couldn't recover.
        Ha, I was actually talking about Guerrero in the 1996 500 not Cogan in the 1986 500, but still. Both drivers were arguably the best in those respective races and didn't come through.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Tree0404 View Post

          Ha, I was actually talking about Guerrero in the 1996 500 not Cogan in the 1986 500, but still. Both drivers were arguably the best in those respective races and didn't come through.
          In 1996 I think the story was, when Roberto had that pit fire, he naturally scrambled out of the car. But when they realized it wasn't so serious, he quickly got back in. But in the rush to get back out on the track and not lose laps, they didn't get a chance to re-plug-in the wire to his radio. So he was without a radio for the final segment of the race.

          In the final restart, he didn't know that he was on a lap by himself. He did not know if he was racing any cars for position on that last lap (turns out he wasn't). So he was racing hard on that last lap just in case, and he was in a tight gaggle of cars. That's when he lost it in turn four, triggering the big wreck. He still finished 5th, his first top five (and first top ten) at Indy since 1987.
          Last edited by Doctorindy; 05-27-2020, 12:17 PM.
          Doctorindy.com

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Doctorindy View Post

            In 1996 I think the story was, when Roberto had that pit fire, he naturally scrambled out of the car. But when they realized it wasn't so serious, he quickly got back in. But in the rush to get back out on the track and not lose laps, they did get have a chance to re-plug-in his the wire to his radio. So he was without a radio for the final segment of the race.

            In the final restart, he didn't know that he was on a lap by himself. He did not know if he was racing any cars for position on that last lap (turns out he wasn't). So he was racing hard on that last lap just in case, and he was in a tight gaggle of cars. That's when he lost it in turn four, triggering the big wreck. He still finished 5th, his first top five (and first top ten) at Indy since 1987.
            That fire happened right in front of us, we thought it would take him out of the race, then out of contention. It didn't.
            "For in the final analysis, our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this small planet. We all breathe the same air, we all cherish our children's future, and we are all mortal".

            John Kennedy at American University 1963

            "Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power"

            A. Lincoln

            Comment


            • #21
              As for me, Cogan permanently redeemed himself with his performance in '86. It was a spectacular win-or-bust effort that fate denied. Didn't he have problems getting the boost set just right to get the most power?

              Before the 1982 Riverside race, Cogan was untouchable fast during a practice day, before Indycars were really dialed in for road racing. Being very aggressive around the dusty track, not even Mario could match his lap times. He could wheel it.
              You have the IndyCar you deserve.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by dalz View Post
                As for me, Cogan permanently redeemed himself with his performance in '86. It was a spectacular win-or-bust effort that fate denied. Didn't he have problems getting the boost set just right to get the most power?

                Before the 1982 Riverside race, Cogan was untouchable fast during a practice day, before Indycars were really dialed in for road racing. Being very aggressive around the dusty track, not even Mario could match his lap times. He could wheel it.
                Somebody, I don't remember just who, speculated that Cogan's waste gate might have been sticking open...resulting in at least some of those banzai-type moves he was making late in the race.

                I also heard rumors that after that crash in '87, Roberto was under intense scrutiny by the racing community after doctors declared him to be 100% recovered; less than 1% of closed-head injury recovery cases fall into that category. So, he felt intense and needless pressure to perform, and that took its toll on him and his career.
                Tibi Fumus Obsidio Septum Doro

                Comment


                • #23
                  Besides the crashes at Indy Roberto crashed twice in practice at Milwaukee. One I'm pretty sure we saw the transporter going south on 94 as we were going north to see practice so he missed the race and the other I got pictures of in turn 2 in the #4 Granatelli car.
                  "You can't arrest those guys, they're folk heroes"
                  "They're criminals"
                  "Well most folk heroes started out as criminals"

                  Comment

                  Unconfigured Ad Widget

                  Collapse
                  Working...
                  X