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1974 Indianapolis 500

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  • #16
    Originally posted by dalz View Post

    Also from the book--the usual tradition of cars racing for 5 minutes after the winner finished ended abruptly this year after people began pouring onto the track as soon as the winner got the checkered.
    If you look closely at old film from Victory Lane you'll see cars on the track zipping by. If you didn't know they kept racing after the winner took the checker you'd have thought races were a lot more competitive than they really were based on the number of cars that finished 200 laps.
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    • #17
      Originally posted by DaveL View Post

      If you look closely at old film from Victory Lane you'll see cars on the track zipping by. If you didn't know they kept racing after the winner took the checker you'd have thought races were a lot more competitive than they really were based on the number of cars that finished 200 laps.
      I think at one time you had to complete so many laps to get any payout.

      Didn't one driver keep going hours after the winner completed 200 laps just to get enough laps in to get some money?
      Live like Dave

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      • #18
        Originally posted by KevMcNJ View Post

        I think at one time you had to complete so many laps to get any payout.

        Didn't one driver keep going hours after the winner completed 200 laps just to get enough laps in to get some money?
        That would have to have been a long time ago, like pre WWII.

        If you look at the box scores you see that the cars that didn't go 200 laps in the allotted time were listed as "flagged" as in that's it, we're done here, get off the track so we can have dinner.
        The Ayn Rand of Indycar

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        Crapping all over threads since 2000.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by KevMcNJ View Post

          I think at one time you had to complete so many laps to get any payout.

          Didn't one driver keep going hours after the winner completed 200 laps just to get enough laps in to get some money?
          Don't quote me but I feel like that story happened in 1912, and certainly within the first five runnings of the race.

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          • #20
            Indy 500s were not typically that competitive until the 1980s. Once the race started before long cars were strung out all around the track and there was minimal racing for position because few cars were ever on the same lap. By the end maybe one or two other cars entered by the few teams with new model year cars would be on the lead lap, but never close enough to challenge the winner. This is what made '82 finish so unique.

            If your car ran all day without any problems, you had a very good chance a top ten finish because of attrition, albeit many laps down to the winner. Official race films are edited to make races appear competitive (NASCAR race films do the same thing) but the reality was much different.
            The Ayn Rand of Indycar

            No one had to badge the Offy.

            Crapping all over threads since 2000.

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            • #21
              I'm guessing the rule to bunch cars under caution played a role in the closer races.
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              • #22
                But the '94(?) race was a good old fashioned blowout.
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                • #23
                  Originally posted by SteveK51 View Post

                  Don't quote me but I feel like that story happened in 1912, and certainly within the first five runnings of the race.
                  Ralph Mulford 1912.

                  It was bothering me so I waded deep in the internet.

                  The report I read stated that only the top 10 received any money so he kept going for over 2.5 hours after every one else stopped.

                  Live like Dave

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                  • #24
                    More on the story of Ralph Mulford at the 1912 Indy 500

                    https://simanaitissays.com/2015/02/0...dy-finisher-2/

                    Sorry for derailing things.
                    Live like Dave

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by KevMcNJ View Post

                      Ralph Mulford 1912.

                      It was bothering me so I waded deep in the internet.

                      The report I read stated that only the top 10 received any money so he kept going for over 2.5 hours after every one else stopped.

                      From a report I've read, while he was doing it the argument raged on about whether he should be allowed to. After he famously stopped for fried chicken, and was eating while driving, somebody important stood out on the track and pointed at their watch, indicating he was on the clock in some way. As the story goes, he immediately jettisoned a breast and got "up" on the wheel.
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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by DaveL View Post
                        Indy 500s were not typically that competitive until the 1980s. Once the race started before long cars were strung out all around the track and there was minimal racing for position because few cars were ever on the same lap. By the end maybe one or two other cars entered by the few teams with new model year cars would be on the lead lap, but never close enough to challenge the winner. This is what made '82 finish so unique.
                        I remember '82. Back then a 10-second lead was "close."

                        I remember McKay exclaiming, "I've never seen an open-wheel car race with the cars this close at the end!"

                        And when Gordy chopped off Mears going into one, Turn 1 radio announcer Ron Carrel exclaimed, "This looks like the START of this race!"

                        It was truly an amazing, never-seen-before finish.

                        Today, if the winner has a half-straightaway margin of victory, everyone is disappointed.

                        Man, that was 38-years ago.

                        Even after 1982, more than three cars on the lead lap was considered competitive.

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                        • #27
                          So, thus what about 1993 .....

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                          • #28
                            In a HOT ROD magazine article in 1974 after the race there is a 4 or 5 page article regarding the great "TURBO" incident. I've got it somewhere and if someone will PM me I can scan it and send for reposting..

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