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Tom Sneva Golfs on Bump Day 1991

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  • #16
    Originally posted by 1969FIRST500 View Post
    Seems like even after Tom lost the top quality rides he wanted to win in equipment that did not support that very well which led to a pretty high crash ratio as i recall. He was one of many that lost it in the cold in 92 at the 500, pretty hard hit.
    Sneva had blown past 10 cars already when he wrecked. He was hooked up, going to the front. I guess something just caught him out. It's too bad. He probably would of finished decent like Al Sr. had he not wrecked.

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    • #17
      DB Mann was meant to be entering the IRL circa 2008. Anyone know what happened?
      "An emphasis was placed on drivers with road racing backgrounds which meant drivers from open wheel, oval track racing were at a disadvantage. That led Tony George to create the IRL." -Indy Review 1996

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      • #18
        It's interesting that no one has picked up on the idea that neither Sneva or Parsons Jr. wanted to get in the car.
        "Versions of a story that are more tidy, compact, and camera-ready should generally be viewed as historically suspect." - Jackson Landers

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        • #19
          Originally posted by JThur1 View Post
          It's interesting that no one has picked up on the idea that neither Sneva or Parsons Jr. wanted to get in the car.
          As I noted earlier, Parsons was in street clothes by the time Mann approached him. Time was too short to make a meaningful effort.
          The Ayn Rand of Indycar

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          • #20
            Originally posted by DaveL View Post
            As I noted earlier, Parsons was in street clothes by the time Mann approached him. Time was too short to make a meaningful effort.
            Yes, you did. And I saw it on ESPN at the time. I just found it interesting that a couple of drivers seemed to be "unavailable" to this particular owner, until it was too late. It's also odd that there didn't seem to be anyone else around that jumped at the chance to drive the car. Maybe there was a reason why Sneva went golfing and stayed out of touch, and Parsons was missing until after he'd changed into street clothes
            Last edited by JThur1; 05-27-2019, 08:18 PM.
            "Versions of a story that are more tidy, compact, and camera-ready should generally be viewed as historically suspect." - Jackson Landers

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            • #21
              Originally posted by JThur1 View Post
              Yes, you did. And I saw it on ESPN at the time. I just found it interesting that a couple of drivers seemed to be "unavailable" to this particular owner, until it was too late. It's also odd that there didn't seem to be anyone else around that jumped at the chance to drive the car. Maybe there was a reason why Sneva went golfing and stayed out of touch, and Parsons was missing until after he'd changed into street clothes
              I don't think anyone was trying to avoid Mann. Parsons' speed was looking pretty good and he wasn't bumped until late in the afternoon. It would have been bad form to ditch the Leader Card team to start practicing another team's car while the Leader Card car was still in the field and it was no sure bet it would be bumped. By the time it was bumped it was too late for Parsons to attempt in the Mann car.

              As for Sneva being out of touch playing golf in the pre-cell phone era, that's something we can only speculate on. I would think if it was really important to him to be in the field that year he would have been at the track ready to get in any car available in case he got bumped.
              The Ayn Rand of Indycar

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              Crapping all over threads since 2000.

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              • #22
                Refresh my memory on Dave Mann's entry. What chassis/model and engine combination was it? Had it been on track at any time during the month...and if so, who drove it?
                "Versions of a story that are more tidy, compact, and camera-ready should generally be viewed as historically suspect." - Jackson Landers

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                • #23
                  Mann had three entries. Two 1990 Lola-Buicks numbered 93 and 99 for John Paul Jr, and an undefined Lola-Buick numbered 96 with no driver listed.

                  Paul Jr got into the race in the no. 93 (chassis no. 90155). The 99 was only ever a back-up but Paul gave it some laps. I doubt the 96 appeared.

                  On the second Saturday, with Paul Jr safely in the field, and only 29 cars qualified, Dave Mann is quoted in the Hungness yearbook as having spoken to three drivers to have a go in the back-up. "If a veteran comes to me, we'll probably give it a shot. I don't think I'd do it with a rookie."

                  Given that it was with fewer than 45 minutes remaining that Willy T bumped Sneva, there was little time anyway for Sneva to bump back in, in an unfamiliar car. Mann confirmed Sneva was one of the three drivers to whom he had spoken - I wonder if Johncock was one of the others. He also tried to tag up with R Kent Baker, suggesting the third driver was Dean Hall.
                  "An emphasis was placed on drivers with road racing backgrounds which meant drivers from open wheel, oval track racing were at a disadvantage. That led Tony George to create the IRL." -Indy Review 1996

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by DaveL View Post
                    As for Sneva being out of touch playing golf in the pre-cell phone era, that's something we can only speculate on. I would think if it was really important to him to be in the field that year he would have been at the track ready to get in any car available in case he got bumped.
                    According to the Star, Sneva was playing golf at Wolf Run golf course on Bump Day.

                    It also said Sneva had only run 11 practice laps all month (all Saturday morning, the 3rd Day of Time Trials). Sneva entered the month without a ride, and made a point that he would not get into an uncompetitive car. Menard came calling Friday (of the second week of practice), and put him in a backup. After a couple laps at 215, they put a new set of tires on it and put it in line. They didn't have a crew yet for the car, and borrowed some guys from the other Menard cars to hastily prep the car. The balance was off, and he only managed a 213. They should have waved it off, but they let him finish. It didn't take long to realize he was likely going to be bumped. Sounds like they didn't have another backup, so it was either he hangs on, or gets bumped. No contingency, no other rides.

                    Playing golf Sunday seems as if it didn't matter. Sounds like he wasn't going to entertain any other rides (i.e., Mann).
                    Doctorindy.com

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Doctorindy View Post

                      Sounds like they didn't have another backup, so it was either he hangs on, or gets bumped. No contingency, no other rides.
                      Menard entered only three cars that year so there would have been no back up.

                      Your version makes sense. Tom wasn't consider anything else so if he got bumped at least he wouldn't have to be there and experience it. He'd be having fun playing golf.
                      The Ayn Rand of Indycar

                      No one had to badge the Offy.

                      Crapping all over threads since 2000.

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                      • #26
                        First, thanks ensign14 for the car/chassis details and info The rest is exactly what I was getting at, that Sneva and Parsons Jr. weren't truly interested in getting into a fairly untested car, that they had not been in at all, with so little time to go. Both were concilliatory towards Mann, not wishing to burn any possible future bridges, but they really didn't want to get into the car.

                        I'm not sure why Tom Sneva gets so much stick around here It's not like he said the Wabash River was nothing compared to the Spokane River, called Drewry's horse p---, or some other perceived crime against Hoosieranity.
                        Last edited by JThur1; 05-30-2019, 01:41 PM. Reason: typo
                        "Versions of a story that are more tidy, compact, and camera-ready should generally be viewed as historically suspect." - Jackson Landers

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