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Anyone knowing a trivia fact shared by the "Iron Duke" and "the Flying Dutchman" ?

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  • Anyone knowing a trivia fact shared by the "Iron Duke" and "the Flying Dutchman" ?

    Just a little quiz....

    I don't know if there are more driver who have managed to do it. But there is at least one achievement that both Duke Nalon and Arie Luyendyk have managed to pull off.
    There are a few things they share as having done. But there is one statistic for which they required more that one year to do it....
    Anyone dare to have a go on what I am thinking of?

    No prize for the fist to post it other than the congratulations.....


  • #2
    Jeopardy style: Indyote, what is started from pole position without having posted the fastest qualifying time, and what is setting the fastest qualifying time but starting from further back in the field?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Glass Half Full View Post
      Jeopardy style: Indyote, what is started from pole position without having posted the fastest qualifying time, and what is setting the fastest qualifying time but starting from further back in the field?
      you have "at" Right but failed on "Wh" and the final coriosity between them.

      Comment


      • #4
        Well, OK, here's the answer.

        There are a few drivers in history who have won at least one pole at Indy and were fastest qualifier too but also were fastest qualifier but not on the pole.

        Billy Arnold, Jimmy Snyder, Duke Nalon, Walt Faulkner, Jack McGrath, Mario Andretti, Tom Sneva and Arie Luyendyk are the men who did such.

        Duke and Arie however share something within the manner they did it. In succesive years they were first fastest yet not on pole and one year later fastest and on pole. (Duke 48-49, Arie '96-97)

        But two other drivers also did it in two successive years but in the opposite manner: Arnold and Faulkner were on Pole on year and the next year fastest yet not on pole. (Arnold 30-31, Faulkner 50-51)

        When Faulkner became fastest qualifier in 1951, he made that Duke Nalon joined another select group; The drivers eho have been on Pole as fastest qualifier but also sat on Pole withput being teh fastest qualifier

        And that makes Duke the only driver ever who achieved all three options: On pole without the fastest time, on pole with the fastest time and not on pole yet fastest qualifier.

        Comment


        • #5
          Luyendyk was also part of that interesting Row 5 in 1991. A handful of drivers waved off or pulled out of line on Saturday awaiting better conditions (Fittipaldi, Luyendyk, Bettenhausen, etc.). But it ended up raining and they were left out. The front row was settled as Mears, Foyt, Andretti.

          On Sunday, Bettenhausen, Luyendyk, and Fittipaldi as Row 5 were combined faster than the front row. Bettenhausen was the overall fastest qualifier, and Luyendyk ended up as the 3rd-fastest qualifier overall. He finished 3rd on race day.
          Doctorindy.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Doctorindy View Post
            Luyendyk was also part of that interesting Row 5 in 1991. A handful of drivers waved off or pulled out of line on Saturday awaiting better conditions (Fittipaldi, Luyendyk, Bettenhausen, etc.). But it ended up raining and they were left out. The front row was settled as Mears, Foyt, Andretti.

            On Sunday, Bettenhausen, Luyendyk, and Fittipaldi as Row 5 were combined faster than the front row. Bettenhausen was the overall fastest qualifier, and Luyendyk ended up as the 3rd-fastest qualifier overall. He finished 3rd on race day.
            I have heard stories about pole day '91 about Foyt being the first to qualify in pretty decent conditions, then Randy Lewis getting out an crashing hard and the track being closed for qualifying for about half an out in which period of time the weather changed into very warm and humid and with it the track conditions turning into nowhere near as good as AJ had them earlier on and because of that a lot of cars not finishing an attempt yet.
            Anyone remember something like that?
            If this is indeed true, it makes you wonder how many of the earlier cars (say the next 8 in line behind Lewis) might have taken the speed they could obtain then instead of waving off. Would AJ and Mario still have been in the front row then?????

            On the other hand, The '91 front row with Rick, AJ and Mario, I think that is most likely one of the most star sprankled front rows ever at Indy, if not the most impressive one ever, even if they were not the three fastest cars in the field...
            The only one I can think of right now that comes the closest in matching the '91 front row will be the '88 with Rick, another 4-time winner and a one-time winner. And this was a line-up that has no question marks `what if`, though I vaguely remember reading something about Mario having to run over a splash of sand after an oil leak or so that spoiled his average and chance to crack the Penske jiggernaut front row????

            Comment


            • #7
              Pole Day 1991 was a bit peculiar. Foyt indeed was probably lucky to go out first. It was hot and sticky that day and conditions got worse as the day went on. Then of course Mears goes out when it's still hot and takes the pole (but not at a track record - which was a little off the norm those days).

              But a lot of cars waved off or got out of line. In doing so, the original qualifying line exhausted fairly early. Then Fittipaldi famously goes out...running fast enough to qualify second...and gets waved off - with storm clouds hovering just to the east. Minutes later it started to rain and the day was done.

              It was 1991...you didn't have weather radar on your phone. Not sure if there was even a weather radar screen at the track. Maybe the local TV stations had one in their trucks. You didn't quite have the benefit of knowing weather was on its way. Those so-called 'calls from Terra Haute' were probably more legends, and they wouldn't have helped much for weather not arriving directly from the west. A situation like that would never happen these days...teams would be scrambling to get out before the rains arrived.
              Doctorindy.com

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