Announcement

Collapse

Upgrade to fix search indexes

We will be upgrading www.trackforum.org at approximately 2019-05-21 14:30:00 Pacific Time. The site will be unavailable during the upgrade and you might experience broken styles, both of which shouldn't last for more than a few minutes. We'll let you know when the upgrade is complete via Facebook and Twitter
https://www.facebook.com/TrackForum/
https://twitter.com/TrackForumLive
See more
See less

I am sure once a AMC V6 was in the Indy 500 but can't find it.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I was thinking I saw the straight 6 engine at Milwaukee 1970-ish.
    “Church supper with grandma and granddad, lets go out and have ourselves the best time we ever had" - John Mellencamp

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Oddy View Post
      I was thinking I saw the straight 6 engine at Milwaukee 1970-ish.
      You did.

      Les Scott drove it at Milwaukee twice in 1969 and once in 1970. Missed the show all three times. That sounds bad but there were a lot more cars back then. In the '69 Rex Mays race that he missed the race started 24 cars but 14 other cars, including Scott in the Navarro Rambler, didn't qualify fast enough and were on the trailer (no one had haulers yet) when the green flag dropped. The car itself was the first rear engine car that Watson built and had finished second in the 1964 500 with Rodger Ward driving.

      Les Scott got the cars' best finish at Trenton when he finished 11th in 1969.

      BTW, Barney Navarro was real legend dating back to dry lakes racing before WWII. He passed away back in 2007. His company is still in operation today under new ownership.

      http://kansascitycaraction.com/2017/...arney-navarro/

      Comment


      • #18
        Wasn't this car one of A.J. Watson's cars from 1964? I also remember one year at Indy it plowed the wall coming out of turn 4 and finished it for the year. There is a picture in one of Clymer's yearbooks of Watson standing by the wrecked car checking it out.
        "You just don't know what Indy Means", Al Unser Jr.

        "That's why to me it does feel more precious when an American wins it...", Michael Andretti

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by kevin99 View Post
          Wasn't this car one of A.J. Watson's cars from 1964? I also remember one year at Indy it plowed the wall coming out of turn 4 and finished it for the year. There is a picture in one of Clymer's yearbooks of Watson standing by the wrecked car checking it out.
          You are correct. The car was built by AJ Watson for Roger Ward in 1964. It was entered in the Indy 500 that year as the Leader Card #2 Kaiser Aluminum entry. It finished second in the 500 and had two other second place finishes that season. In 1966/7 close season it was sold to Norm Hall, who linked up with Barney Navarro to use the 199 ci 6-cylinder AMC Rambler turbo engine Navarro Engineering was developing. The car appeared from 1967-72 but, as a general rule, failed to qualify. It was later acquired from Navarro by Roger Ward and restored to it's 1964 specifications. The car is now on display at the Malloy Foundation Collection (Corona, California).

          I should add that in 1971 the car crashed in early morning practice on Bump day ending any effort to qualify... However the car did come back in 1972 for another attempt at Indy.

          Comment


          • #20
            https://worldpowersystems.com/AMC/Navarro-turbo-motor

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by stockblock View Post
              Thanks to all above for information on the AMC 6. I researched its history over the last couple days and here is what i found.

              1969

              Other races during season- 1st Trenton race 33 cars show up for a field of 26. AMC 6 qualifies 21st and finished 11th still running at the end. 2nd Trenton race 31 cars show up for a field of 28. AMC 6 qualifies 25th and finishes in 20th place lasting only 47 laps as a result of a ignition problem. IRP AMC 6 qualifies 24th and finishes in 23th place lasting only 11 laps as a result of oil pressure. Car also appears at both Milwaukee races, Brainard, 2nd Phoenix race, and California but fails to qualify at those 5 races.
              Good rundown, but which race does California mean for 1969?

              "Versions of a story that are more tidy, compact, and camera-ready should generally be viewed as historically suspect." - Jackson Landers

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by JThur1 View Post
                Good rundown, but which race does California mean for 1969?
                Hanford early or Riverside for the finale. Given the context I'm thinking Riverside.
                "Only a fool fights in a burning house."-Kang

                "If you listen to fools....The Maaahhhhb Ruuuules....."-Ronnie James Dio

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Sea Fury View Post

                  Hanford early or Riverside for the finale. Given the context I'm thinking Riverside.
                  It was indeed Riverside.
                  Real drivers don't need fenders!

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Sea Fury View Post

                    Hanford early or Riverside for the finale. Given the context I'm thinking Riverside.
                    I'm well aware of the possibilities, I just wondered which?

                    I also wonder if the AMC showed up for the Riverside race, or not. Despite great efforts by Phil Harms and Jason Bach's work at Champcarstats.com, there are still plenty of question marks on who showed up and who actually took to the track for practice.

                    Donald Davidson will tell you how difficult it is to determine which drivers got on track in earlier decades at Indianapolis.
                    "Versions of a story that are more tidy, compact, and camera-ready should generally be viewed as historically suspect." - Jackson Landers

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      The Buick V6 was an AMC V6 for a while.
                      Racing ain't much, but workin's nothing. Richard Tharp

                      Lying was a no-brainer for me. Robin Miller

                      "I thought they booed [Danica] because she was being a complete jerk, but then they applauded for A.J. Foyt. Now I'm just confused."

                      The real world sucks. Ed McCullough

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by atrackforumfan View Post
                        The Buick V6 was an AMC V6 for a while.
                        Can you elaborate? The first Buick I'm aware was Brayton's in '84.
                        The Ayn Rand of Indycar

                        No one had to badge the Offy.

                        Crapping all over threads since 2000.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          He doesn't mean the racing engine.

                          The original Buick V6 from the early 60's was sold to Kaiser Jeep, and then AMC bought Kaiser Jeep.

                          Later, GM bought the Buick V6 back from AMC & re-engineered it into the later, more familiar version.


                          "It is a besetting vice of democracies to substitute public opinion for law. This is the usual form in which masses of men exhibit their tyranny." - James Fenimore Cooper

                          "One man with courage is a majority." - Thomas Jefferson

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by KenK View Post
                            He doesn't mean the racing engine.

                            The original Buick V6 from the early 60's was sold to Kaiser Jeep, and then AMC bought Kaiser Jeep.

                            Later, GM bought the Buick V6 back from AMC & re-engineered it into the later, more familiar version.

                            That would explain it.
                            The Ayn Rand of Indycar

                            No one had to badge the Offy.

                            Crapping all over threads since 2000.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X