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Question about Jim Robbins' Old 67

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  • Question about Jim Robbins' Old 67

    I'm reading Month At The Brickyard by Sonny Kleinfield, and he mentions the Jim Robbins Company Special from 1970 occupying a (carpeted)garage space despite not having competed for six years. Does anyone know how long the Robbins car was allowed in the garage, and were there any other older gems hidden away during this time(mid-late 70's)?

  • #2
    '76 was the last year for the Robbins entry.

    Great book, BTW. Required reading for anyone interested in the history of the race.

    The Ayn Rand of Indycar

    No one had to badge the Offy.

    Crapping all over threads since 2000.

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    • #3
      I'm really enjoying it so far, I like that it's focused on a lower-budget team and its coming and goings throughout the month. I also never knew that Johnny Parsons and Pancho Carter were half brothers.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by DaveL View Post
        '76 was the last year for the Robbins entry.

        Great book, BTW. Required reading for anyone interested in the history of the race.
        Wow. I had no idea there was a Robbins entry as late as 1976! Who was the driver?
        Real drivers don't need fenders!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 1987Carzan View Post
          I'm really enjoying it so far, I like that it's focused on a lower-budget team and its coming and goings throughout the month. I also never knew that Johnny Parsons and Pancho Carter were half brothers.
          Another interesting Pancho Carter fact: he was born in Racine, Wisconsin as his mom and dad were driving to 1950 Rex Mays Classic at the Milwaukee Mile! Racine is about 30 minutes from where I'm sitting right now.
          Real drivers don't need fenders!

          Comment


          • #6
            I do recall once reading that when Jim Robbins died - his allocated enough money in his will to fund his team for 10 years after his death. Not sure when he died - but this could possibly be part of the story.
            Real drivers don't need fenders!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Pelican Joe View Post

              Wow. I had no idea there was a Robbins entry as late as 1976! Who was the driver?
              No one. The car (an old obsolete model) was entered and never budged from the garage. It was the Robbins family's way of protesting the increasing costs to go racing (sound familiar?)
              The Ayn Rand of Indycar

              No one had to badge the Offy.

              Crapping all over threads since 2000.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Pelican Joe View Post
                I do recall once reading that when Jim Robbins died - his allocated enough money in his will to fund his team for 10 years after his death. Not sure when he died - but this could possibly be part of the story.
                The Jim Robbins Company had injection molding and seat belt manufacturing facilities in Michigan and Tennessee. They were a supplier to the Detroit automakers of items like dashboards, arm rests, and handles. I've seen the Robbins logo (two robins sitting on a sign) on interior parts from older model cars.

                Robbins died in the crash of his company jet in South Dakota in September of 1966. I'm not sure about the details but it seems like his will specified to his family that they enter a car in the Indianqapolis 500 for the next ten years which they did. However, as has already been noted after 1970 the old Gerhardt car was entered but never left the garage. The car sat locked up in the Gasoline Alley garage year round until sometime in 1976.

                Robbins also backed cars in NASCAR. Through his Detroit ties he was able to sponsor some factory backed Grand National cars. Lee Roy Yarbrough was his main driver and that sponsorship went on through 1969 at least. Maybe someone here knows more about this.

                And, of course, Jim Robbins owned the car that Jerry Hoyt put on the pole for the 1955 Indianapolis 500 after a late day run when everyone else had decided to wait until Sunday.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Pelican Joe View Post

                  Another interesting Pancho Carter fact: he was born in Racine, Wisconsin as his mom and dad were driving to 1950 Rex Mays Classic at the Milwaukee Mile! Racine is about 30 minutes from where I'm sitting right now.
                  Ha! What a way to enter the world.

                  So... Did they still make it to the race?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by indyrjc View Post

                    The Jim Robbins Company had injection molding and seat belt manufacturing facilities in Michigan and Tennessee. They were a supplier to the Detroit automakers of items like dashboards, arm rests, and handles. I've seen the Robbins logo (two robins sitting on a sign) on interior parts from older model cars.

                    Robbins died in the crash of his company jet in South Dakota in September of 1966. I'm not sure about the details but it seems like his will specified to his family that they enter a car in the Indianqapolis 500 for the next ten years which they did. However, as has already been noted after 1970 the old Gerhardt car was entered but never left the garage. The car sat locked up in the Gasoline Alley garage year round until sometime in 1976.

                    Robbins also backed cars in NASCAR. Through his Detroit ties he was able to sponsor some factory backed Grand National cars. Lee Roy Yarbrough was his main driver and that sponsorship went on through 1969 at least. Maybe someone here knows more about this.

                    And, of course, Jim Robbins owned the car that Jerry Hoyt put on the pole for the 1955 Indianapolis 500 after a late day run when everyone else had decided to wait until Sunday.
                    Great info, thanks.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      He made seat belts too.
                      "Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved
                      body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting
                      "...holy $^!+...what a ride!"
                      >

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 1987Carzan View Post

                        Ha! What a way to enter the world.

                        So... Did they still make it to the race?
                        According to champcarstats.com - looks like Duane Carter did make it to the race, but then did not make it into the race. DNS - too slow.
                        Real drivers don't need fenders!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Pelican Joe View Post

                          According to champcarstats.com - looks like Duane Carter did make it to the race, but then did not make it into the race. DNS - too slow.
                          Now THAT is dedication. Also I never knew about champcarstats.com until now, I know where I'll be spending the next few days online.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Niseguy View Post
                            He made seat belts too.
                            That was mentioned in the first sentence of post #8:

                            Originally posted by indyrjc View Post
                            The Jim Robbins Company had injection molding and seat belt manufacturing facilities in Michigan and Tennessee.


                            "I would really like to go to NASCAR. I really enjoy NASCAR and if I could be there in a couple of years that's where I'd want to be." - Jeff Gordon (after testing a Formula Super Vee)

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by 1987Carzan View Post
                              I'm really enjoying it so far, I like that it's focused on a lower-budget team and its coming and goings throughout the month. I also never knew that Johnny Parsons and Pancho Carter were half brothers.
                              Don't forget little brother Dana Carter in that family too

                              Comment

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