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1988 Indy 500 on YouTube

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Field of 33 View Post
    Those are almost my exact seats I had for 30 years in the Tower Terrace. We were in section 47, row J, and as I recall, we were directly behind Bobby Rahal's pit in that year. My guess is this video was take from about section 50-52. What great memories!
    I'm a little north of you all (section 61 now). I think back then it was called the Tower Extension or something like that, and I think they were wooden bleachers. We were behind Phil Krueger's pit that year. He took an '86 March to an 8th place finish.
    http://www.honorflight.org/

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    • #17
      1988 was absolutely the largest crowd I have seen at Indy. Bigger than 2016, IMO. What a throng. Traffic was historically horrible. We pulled off 465 at Crawfordville Rd and immediately ground to a halt. For HOURS. Never moved an inch. Only time I really thought we were going to miss the start. I was about to abandon my car and hoof it. Like a miracle, the traffic started moving and we made it to our seats just as the green was dropped. We were young and crazy back then. Drove overnight from Chicago to Indy, baked all day in the hot sun, drove home to Detroit, went to a house party when we got home. Good times.
      "The track will choose who's going to win."

      Tony Kanaan

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      • #18
        Originally posted by jp View Post
        1988 was absolutely the largest crowd I have seen at Indy. Bigger than 2016, IMO.
        Some have conjectured that 1988 might have been the "biggest ever." Donald Davidson is one who has casually floated that theory. Not sure if he is hinting any inside information. At the time, the infield of all four turns was available to be packed with fans, and the old 9-hole golf course was still in place (and they still allowed parking on it). The 1988 crowd was enormous. The state of the sport was at a high point, the warm weather helped the walk-up crowd, etc.

        The only reservation I have against declaring 1988 the "biggest" was the number of seats. At the time, the north end was not closed up, only the little K Stand was in the northchute. It was replaced in 1993 with the new North Vista which wrapped all the way around and closed the north end. They did take down the Backstretch Bleachers in 1993, but there was still a net gain of seats. Did the overflowing infield crowd of 1988 still beat the crowd of 1993-1994? We'll never know, but I still think that 1993-1994 was equal if not slightly bigger.
        Doctorindy.com

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Chris Paff View Post
          Where do you sit now?
          We moved across the front straight last year and into the shade. We are now in Paddock Box 12, just south of the S/F line.
          --Paul Dalbey
          (the poster formerly known as 'pdalbey')

          Different men, from vastly different backgrounds, focused on the same goal – a white line painted on a yard of brick 500 miles ahead.

          http://Fieldof33.com

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Field of 33 View Post
            We moved across the front straight last year and into the shade. We are now in Paddock Box 12, just south of the S/F line.
            Very nice.. I am in Turn 4 J Stand Section 30
            "Paff has been closer to the mark than anyone will give him credit for."

            Richard Kimble 11/18/2010

            "Paff is far more right than any of you will EVER give him credit for.

            As non politically correct and un IndyCar friendly as it is, it's the truth. "

            SeeuInMay 12/29/2010

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Doctorindy View Post
              It was pretty hot that day. I guess not quite as hot (ambient temp.) as some of the races were experienced in more recent years...2006, 2010, etc. But it was muggy and hot that day so the track was slick. They were all over the track and apron (particularly Crawford) just trying to get around.

              The apron was rough and bumpy back them, and unsettling to the car at times. Even Sullivan's spin in 1985 can be attributed to clipping over the apron seam.

              1988 was Paul Page's first on television (And likewise Lou Palmer's first as chief announcer on radio). The TV broadcast was vastly improved from the '86 and '87 live edition, as behind the scenes, a lot of changes were going on at ABC Sports. First they had Page in place (he actually was hired in Sept. 1987). One of the directors Larry Kamm was gone, replaced with Don Ohlmeyer, as well as changes with the producers, etc. Right away with Ohlmeyer & Page, and others, they began transforming the broadcast from an 'event' telecast to more of a 'racing' broadcast. You can notice a lot of differences coming in the broadcast in 1988, and even more improvements for 1989-1990.

              No longer was it "This is Jim McKay reporting from Indianapolis"...catering to the 'we watch auto racing one day a year' audience. It was coverage that was appropriate for the casual and the knowledgeable diehards. Gone was the camera on a crane across the street on 16th Street. Now we had multiple racecams, speed shots, giving drivers outside the top ten attention. Treating it like an Indy car race instead of Olympic bobsledding & weightlifting.
              88 still had some growing pains. They did a feature on Mario Andretti that was recycled completely from the 87 telecast with only a change in the music and with Sam narrating it instead of the now departed from ABC, Al Trautwig. Brian Hammons was a weak link in the pits and it wasn't until they got Gary Gerould to come over from NBC that they finally had the best possible team in place.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Eric Paddon View Post
                88 still had some growing pains. They did a feature on Mario Andretti that was recycled completely from the 87 telecast with only a change in the music and with Sam narrating it instead of the now departed from ABC, Al Trautwig. Brian Hammons was a weak link in the pits and it wasn't until they got Gary Gerould to come over from NBC that they finally had the best possible team in place.
                And they covered the pits with only two reporters. That’s crazy. The radio was using four, and previously they at least had three. That must have been a lot of running up and down pit lane...which we all know is long. Although since they only put focus on the front running cars, they were probably spending most of the afternoon down at the south end and ignoring the north end (except for Mario who always liked the stall up north with the opening).
                Doctorindy.com

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Eric Paddon View Post
                  88 still had some growing pains. They did a feature on Mario Andretti that was recycled completely from the 87 telecast with only a change in the music and with Sam narrating it instead of the now departed from ABC, Al Trautwig. Brian Hammons was a weak link in the pits and it wasn't until they got Gary Gerould to come over from NBC that they finally had the best possible team in place.
                  That's kind of odd you felt that way about Hammons. I was just listening to the 1992 radio broadcast and thought "I kinda miss Brian Hammons. He does a good job." To each their own, I suppose. I had actually forgotten he even had anything to do with auto racing for many years. I remembered him more for being one of the very first hosts on the brand new Golf Channel probably back around 1995. (If I'm not mistaken, Scott Van Pelt also got his "big time" start at the Golf Channel around that time.)
                  --Paul Dalbey
                  (the poster formerly known as 'pdalbey')

                  Different men, from vastly different backgrounds, focused on the same goal – a white line painted on a yard of brick 500 miles ahead.

                  http://Fieldof33.com

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    He was a little better on radio (essentially he and Gerould swapped jobs. Gerould moved from NBC to ABC and gave up his place on the radio network and Hammons took those slots at NBC and the radio network). But in 1988, I can't ever forget him trying to get a comment from Al Unser, Jr. after he dropped out and he sticks the mic in and goes, "Little Al?" and only gets a "What?" response.

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                    • #25
                      That is a very good home video, it really gives a feel for the electricity and anticipation for the race. God I miss those days.
                      Everyone locked in and living in the moment, no cell phones. (other than video camera guy)

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