Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1988 Indy 500 on YouTube

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 1988 Indy 500 on YouTube

    I know all the history of the 500 about as well as anyone, and I've seen all the Indy 500 Legends DVDs many times, all the ESPN 1/2 hour summaries of the races, watched all the races live (or on tape back in the day) as they happened since '71, and have had the pleasure of seeing at least a dozen races from the grandstands.

    We all know that the last decade has had some of the most competitive and drama-filled races ever, and sometimes when we look back to the "good old days" when the leaders would get a lap on the entire field, well the "good old days" just don't seem so grand in today's light.

    Well on one of these snowed in days I thought I would watch an old race in it's entirety just to see what it was really like, and not just a 20 minute ESPN summary. I chose 1988.

    What a surprise! That particular race was filled all sorts of action and drama. And I'm just going to leave it at that for those younger fans who might not even know who won it and want to watch it. Definitely a different kind of event than what we see today, but one can understand why they were filling the place in those years. And there were a couple of goofy, little things that happened in that race that I have forgotten about (well the last time I watched the whole race, was in 1988!).

    One thing I can mention that won't ruin your enjoyment of watching is that both Sam Posey and Uncle Bobby can't seem to grasp the fact that sometimes drivers just overcook a corner and either spin out or simply push into the wall. They both keep coming up with mechanical failure theories that of course never panned out. In the one accident where there was an obvious mechanical, Paul Page was the one who spotted what it was!

    I guess the goofy intro with pole sitter Rick Mears was the first time the Delta Force music was used.

    Anyway, if you want to use up around 3 hours in the off-season check this one out (I skipped the pre-race). I watched it on YouTube from my smart TV (Roku). It's actually a very high-quality video considering its age.

    You will also see why many of us cry "Bring Back the Apron"! It is used extensively throughout the race and really spices up the action in the corners (and no, there aren't any of the "bad angle" cashes it supposedly was a cause of. It's odd that that only seemed to become a concern after the '92 event- why wasn't it shown to be a problem back in '88?).

    "Charging a man with murder here was like handing out speeding tickets at the Indy 500."- Capt. Willard, Apocolypse Now
    "Ain't nuthin' like [being with a woman], 'cept maybe the Indy 500."- Bunny, Platoon
    "To alcohol! The cause of- and solution to- all of life's problems."- Homer J. Simpson

  • #2
    Originally posted by Stick500 View Post
    You will also see why many of us cry "Bring Back the Apron"! It is used extensively throughout the race and really spices up the action in the corners (and no, there aren't any of the "bad angle" cashes it supposedly was a cause of. It's odd that that only seemed to become a concern after the '92 event- why wasn't it shown to be a problem back in '88?
    Yes, pretty good race.

    1988 was the last year before the repave that made the apron the same angle of banking and smoothness as the racing surface, making it effectively the new racing line, aside from a ham-handed attempt to curb it the first year. The idea of an apron is to give a slowing or disabled car a place to go safely off the racing surface. It's not supposed to be the de facto racetrack.

    I'm for bringing the apron back IF it's less than half the degree of banking of the turns. If you really want to use it, and risk disrupting the car, go for it. Just like in '88.
    "If you see you're gonna miss, grit your teeth."--Evel Knievel

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by dalz View Post
      1988 was the last year before the repave that made the apron the same angle of banking and smoothness as the racing surface, making it effectively the new racing line, aside from a ham-handed attempt to curb it the first year. The idea of an apron is to give a slowing or disabled car a place to go safely off the racing surface. It's not supposed to be the de facto racetrack.

      I'm for bringing the apron back IF it's less than half the degree of banking of the turns. If you really want to use it, and risk disrupting the car, go for it. Just like in '88.
      Ah, I forgot about that. Guys were using it like crazy in '88. I like your idea of replacing it and leaving it flatter.
      "Charging a man with murder here was like handing out speeding tickets at the Indy 500."- Capt. Willard, Apocolypse Now
      "Ain't nuthin' like [being with a woman], 'cept maybe the Indy 500."- Bunny, Platoon
      "To alcohol! The cause of- and solution to- all of life's problems."- Homer J. Simpson

      Comment


      • #4
        They cut waaaaaayyyy below the line and all the way on the apron through Turn 4.

        Yes, 1988 was the first year for Delta Force. 1988 was also the first year that Paul Page did the Indy 500 on TV.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Stick500 View Post
          ......

          We all know that the last decade has had some of the most competitive and drama-filled races ever, and sometimes when we look back to the "good old days" when the leaders would get a lap on the entire field, well the "good old days" just don't seem so grand in today's light.

          .......
          You realize, of course, that a few leaders would be laps ahead today if not for the fact that IndyCar manipulates the competition now to enhance the "show". That didn't go on in 1988.

          Allowing multi lap bunch ups with the pits closed brings tailenders back to front running pack. And waving multiple cars either a lap down or about to go a lap down past the pace car before restarts (and if "needed" sometimes even letting them top off with fuel while holding the green flag back) artificially makes today's racing closer than it really is.

          In 1988 track conditions determined the length of caution periods. Today television commercials often do. That and having the officials purposely extending yellows toward the end of the race so that no one runs out of fuel.

          There really is no comparison of today's "racing" with that of the past. Two different animals completely. Mechanical failures were common in 1988. They hardly happen at all today.

          Today's 500 isn't really a 500 mile race at all; there's just a lot of positioning going on for the first 400 miles or so while waiting for the end. The only meaningful racing takes place after the final pit stops have been completed.

          :I500

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by MS View Post
            They cut waaaaaayyyy below the line and all the way on the apron through Turn 4.
            It was pretty hot that day. I guess not quite as hot (ambient temp.) as some of the races were experienced in more recent years...2006, 2010, etc. But it was muggy and hot that day so the track was slick. They were all over the track and apron (particularly Crawford) just trying to get around.

            The apron was rough and bumpy back them, and unsettling to the car at times. Even Sullivan's spin in 1985 can be attributed to clipping over the apron seam.

            1988 was Paul Page's first on television (And likewise Lou Palmer's first as chief announcer on radio). The TV broadcast was vastly improved from the '86 and '87 live edition, as behind the scenes, a lot of changes were going on at ABC Sports. First they had Page in place (he actually was hired in Sept. 1987). One of the directors Larry Kamm was gone, replaced with Don Ohlmeyer, as well as changes with the producers, etc. Right away with Ohlmeyer & Page, and others, they began transforming the broadcast from an 'event' telecast to more of a 'racing' broadcast. You can notice a lot of differences coming in the broadcast in 1988, and even more improvements for 1989-1990.

            No longer was it "This is Jim McKay reporting from Indianapolis"...catering to the 'we watch auto racing one day a year' audience. It was coverage that was appropriate for the casual and the knowledgeable diehards. Gone was the camera on a crane across the street on 16th Street. Now we had multiple racecams, speed shots, giving drivers outside the top ten attention. Treating it like an Indy car race instead of Olympic bobsledding & weightlifting.
            Doctorindy.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Stick500 View Post
              We all know that the last decade has had some of the most competitive and drama-filled races ever, and sometimes when we look back to the "good old days" when the leaders would get a lap on the entire field, well the "good old days" just don't seem so grand in today's light.
              You can look at a box score and come to wrong conclusion about how competitive a race was. The box score for the '84 500 for instance shows Mears winning by 2 laps. It doesn't show you that there were multiple contenders who dropped out for various reasons and the race was anything but a cake walk.
              The Ayn Rand of Indycar

              No one had to badge the Offy.

              Crapping all over threads since 2000.

              Comment


              • #8
                Well Said!!!!!!!!!

                Originally posted by indyrjc View Post
                You realize, of course, that a few leaders would be laps ahead today if not for the fact that IndyCar manipulates the competition now to enhance the "show". That didn't go on in 1988.

                Allowing multi lap bunch ups with the pits closed brings tailenders back to front running pack. And waving multiple cars either a lap down or about to go a lap down past the pace car before restarts (and if "needed" sometimes even letting them top off with fuel while holding the green flag back) artificially makes today's racing closer than it really is.

                In 1988 track conditions determined the length of caution periods. Today television commercials often do. That and having the officials purposely extending yellows toward the end of the race so that no one runs out of fuel.

                There really is no comparison of today's "racing" with that of the past. Two different animals completely. Mechanical failures were common in 1988. They hardly happen at all today.

                Today's 500 isn't really a 500 mile race at all; there's just a lot of positioning going on for the first 400 miles or so while waiting for the end. The only meaningful racing takes place after the final pit stops have been completed.

                :I500

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by MS View Post
                  They cut waaaaaayyyy below the line and all the way on the apron through Turn 4.
                  Mario got penalized in 1991 for racing under the yellow line which designated where the bottom of the turn 4 apron should've been but there was just more pavement for the pit-in. I wonder if Arie inspired that rule, as he was very aggressive and using a lot of low areas of turn 4 as he was pouring it on in the last 20 laps the previous year.
                  "If you see you're gonna miss, grit your teeth."--Evel Knievel

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by indyrjc View Post
                    You realize, of course, that a few leaders would be laps ahead today if not for the fact that IndyCar manipulates the competition now to enhance the "show". That didn't go on in 1988.

                    Allowing multi lap bunch ups with the pits closed brings tailenders back to front running pack. And waving multiple cars either a lap down or about to go a lap down past the pace car before restarts (and if "needed" sometimes even letting them top off with fuel while holding the green flag back) artificially makes today's racing closer than it really is.

                    In 1988 track conditions determined the length of caution periods. Today television commercials often do. That and having the officials purposely extending yellows toward the end of the race so that no one runs out of fuel.

                    There really is no comparison of today's "racing" with that of the past. Two different animals completely. Mechanical failures were common in 1988. They hardly happen at all today.

                    Today's 500 isn't really a 500 mile race at all; there's just a lot of positioning going on for the first 400 miles or so while waiting for the end. The only meaningful racing takes place after the final pit stops have been completed.

                    :I500
                    Which is how you end up with car/driver combos who run 18th to 24th all day long in contention to win the thing if they just try to play pit strategy (see: Harvey, S. Wilson in 2018, Ed Jones in 2017, Rossi to a certain extent in 2016, though his was a much LONGER play on fuel saving/pit strategy than the aforementioned examples).

                    Not a fan.

                    I don't mind a driver lucking into a win persay, but I'd at least like for them to be a top 5-10 contender for most of the day. Not top 25.

                    I think Pippa even climbed up to 2nd or 3rd place with a couple to go in 2016 before having to pit.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by indyrjc View Post
                      You realize, of course, that a few leaders would be laps ahead today if not for the fact that IndyCar manipulates the competition now to enhance the "show". That didn't go on in 1988.

                      Allowing multi lap bunch ups with the pits closed brings tailenders back to front running pack. And waving multiple cars either a lap down or about to go a lap down past the pace car before restarts (and if "needed" sometimes even letting them top off with fuel while holding the green flag back) artificially makes today's racing closer than it really is.

                      In 1988 track conditions determined the length of caution periods. Today television commercials often do. That and having the officials purposely extending yellows toward the end of the race so that no one runs out of fuel.

                      There really is no comparison of today's "racing" with that of the past. Two different animals completely. Mechanical failures were common in 1988. They hardly happen at all today.

                      Today's 500 isn't really a 500 mile race at all; there's just a lot of positioning going on for the first 400 miles or so while waiting for the end. The only meaningful racing takes place after the final pit stops have been completed.

                      :I500
                      Very good post!




                      Dan
                      Tibi Fumus Obsidio Septum Doro

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Stick500 View Post
                        We all know that the last decade has had some of the most competitive and drama-filled races ever, and sometimes when we look back to the "good old days" when the leaders would get a lap on the entire field, well the "good old days" just don't seem so grand in today's light.
                        Each to his own, I guess, but I'm totally with Randall here, today's races are a yawn fest to me, they are about as exciting as watching a dice roll - unless you have a wad of money invested in one number, it's just an endless bore, nothing else. I remember watching a relatively recent Indy 500, though it may have been ten years or so ago, when towards the end, every couple laps a new leader emerged from the shadows, names I'd never heard of, including a guy called Lasagne or Baguette, I don't know, but it was just ridiculous. The last '500' I ever watched.

                        I think it has to do with attention span. Races in the past were sometimes won by a lap or two, but if you watched the whole race unfold, and how the winner got his big lead, it was never boring. Of course, people of the 21st century can't stay tuned for three or four hours on end, they need the commercial breaks and the full course yellows to stay awake, or to keep their hands off their cell phones. It just isn't the same sport any longer.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A very nice home video of the 1988 race.

                          Doctorindy.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Those are almost my exact seats I had for 30 years in the Tower Terrace. We were in section 47, row J, and as I recall, we were directly behind Bobby Rahal's pit in that year. My guess is this video was take from about section 50-52. What great memories!
                            --Paul Dalbey
                            (the poster formerly known as 'pdalbey')

                            Different men, from vastly different backgrounds, focused on the same goal – a white line painted on a yard of brick 500 miles ahead.

                            http://Fieldof33.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Field of 33 View Post
                              Those are almost my exact seats I had for 30 years in the Tower Terrace. We were in section 47, row J, and as I recall, we were directly behind Bobby Rahal's pit in that year. My guess is this video was take from about section 50-52. What great memories!
                              Where do you sit now?
                              "Paff has been closer to the mark than anyone will give him credit for."

                              Richard Kimble 11/18/2010

                              "Paff is far more right than any of you will EVER give him credit for.

                              As non politically correct and un IndyCar friendly as it is, it's the truth. "

                              SeeuInMay 12/29/2010

                              Comment

                              Responsive 1

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X