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  • Joe Archuleta

    I have been looking up various older Indy car drivers and I came across one named Joe Archuleta.

    Literally the only information that I could find on him came from his ChampCarStats page (http://www.champcarstats.com/drivers/ArchuletaJoe.htm). It says he was born on December 18, 1942 in Santa Fe, New Mexico and died on June 14, 1986 and that his only entry was at Phoenix in 1981 in the #44 A-1 Transmission Sugai Fox-Offenhauser, but failed to appear.

    Does anybody have any more information or even images of him?
    Last edited by Rhino Ryan; 12-10-2018, 09:27 PM.

  • #2
    If Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Champ_Car_teams) is to be believed, he drove for his own team called Joe Archuleta Racing.

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    • #3
      Try contacting indy44 here on TF. I bet he might know.
      You've worked so hard on the kidney. Very special -- the kidney has a very special place in the heart. It's an incredible thing. Donald John Trump

      Brian's Wish * Jason Foundation

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      • #4
        https://www.newspapers.com/clip/26119700/

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        • #5
          ... and here's a picture: https://www.newspapers.com/clip/26119947/

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Jamski View Post
            Try contacting indy44 here on TF. I bet he might know.
            I also asked this question on the IndyCar Reddit and it was recommended that the person who operates that account may be related to him, as they are both from New Mexico.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Michael Ferner View Post
              Originally posted by Michael Ferner View Post
              Thank you!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Jamski View Post
                Try contacting indy44 here on TF. I bet he might know.
                Yes, it is his father, I wondered if that was the case when I heard the name of the person who runs that Twitter account.

                https://twitter.com/indy44/status/1072240872295555072

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                • #9
                  It is a bit of a sad story. But he never thought to try and start it before he went to the race?

                  40K was a ton of dough in 1981. Wonder how much he lost on the deal.
                  "Charging a man with murder here was like handing out speeding tickets at the Indy 500."- Capt. Willard, Apocolypse Now
                  "Ain't nuthin' like [being with a woman], 'cept maybe the Indy 500."- Bunny, Platoon
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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Stick500 View Post
                    It is a bit of a sad story. But he never thought to try and start it before he went to the race?

                    40K was a ton of dough in 1981. Wonder how much he lost on the deal.
                    It would be something like $100K in 2018 dollars. I agree, a bit of a sad story...but also a bit odd that he wasn't aware it would not run until he got it to the track? Heckuva gamble to buy a car sight unseen.
                    Real drivers don't need fenders!

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                    • #11
                      Here is a picture of Archuleta in the Sugai Fox:

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                      • #12
                        Sounds like he was a bit naïve.

                        Originally posted by Michael Ferner View Post
                        I looked up the address on Google. I see no repair shop and I see no cemetary across the street.
                        Live like Dave

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                        • #13
                          As hard as it seems to believe now, there was a time in all top racing series where just about the only requirement was showing up with a car and demonstrating that you weren't a menace. If you were ridiculously slow or drove squirrelly, you got parked. Otherwise, they let you run. It reminds me of some folks mentioning that most California drivers in NASCAR in the 60s & 70s weren't impressive, and since they aren't aware of the driver's backgrounds, I have to point out that many of these guys weren't remotely close to being track champions - or even that competitive locally in some cases - they were just intrepid souls that decided they wanted to give it a shot. Many a story is just like Joe Archuleta. They saw an ad or heard about a car for sale and decided to go for it, then head to the South or Midwest.

                          In that regard, even the "ride buyers"* have a lot more background and experience nowadays

                          *I know some here don't want to admit it, but "ride buying" has gone on almost from day one in racing
                          "Versions of a story that are more tidy, compact, and camera-ready should generally be viewed as historically suspect." - Jackson Landers

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JThur1 View Post
                            As hard as it seems to believe now, there was a time in all top racing series where just about the only requirement was showing up with a car and demonstrating that you weren't a menace. If you were ridiculously slow or drove squirrelly, you got parked.......
                            You are correct although I think it was more prevalent in NASCAR than anywhere else. I'd like to know the whole story on Archuleta. Apparently he was allowed to enter the car at Phoenix but was he actually issued a Championship license by CART to drive? I'm pretty sure USAC would never have given him a license but maybe CART had different procedures.

                            The reason I say that is that I remember a Midwest midget driver that had run in local clubs for a couple of seasons and had even won a feature at Winchester. However, he was turned down by USAC for a Midget Division license in about 1974 and was told to get more experience. They did allow him to join USAC the next year.

                            That may have been a unique case. I've heard other stories where drivers with almost no experience were allowed to run on some pretty fast and dangerous tracks.

                            Along those same lines do you remember Arlene Hiss at Phoenix in 1976? She had zero high speed experience and IIRC came from a background in SCCA Showroom Stock racing. However, she was given a USAC license and somehow managed to actually qualify while a bunch of other drivers missed the show. She was around at the finish although many, many laps down while at least staying out of everyone's way. I'm pretty sure she ran some NASCAR GN races after that. Later on I believe she became a professor at both the University of Phoenix and Southern New Hampshire University and is still teaching.

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                            • #15
                              Some of us on the West Coast who saw more of Arlene than others thought she was a better driver than her husband.

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