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AAA Contest Board Sanction Listing, 1909-1931

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  • AAA Contest Board Sanction Listing, 1909-1931

    For those few who might be interested, I have (finally, at long last...) completed a listing of the sanctions granted by the Contest Board of the AAA from 1909 to the end of the 1931 season.

    It might be of some use/interest to several of you.

    [whine] At the moment, I have little interest and even less desire to push forward to complete the listing to the end of the 1941 season at any point in the foreseeable future. This was time-consuming enough, taking time away from my other research.[/whine]

    At some point, it should be available at the link provided below:

    https://www.academia.edu/19589510/Th...tion_1909-1931
    And so we beat on, boats against the current, drawn back ceaselessly into the past ... F. Scott Fitzgerald
    Ever have the feeling that the rest of the world is a tuxedo and you're a pair of brown shoes? ... George Gobel

  • #2
    Thanks for all of your work in compiling this list, Don. The information that you provide is always appreciated.

    I'll be one of those attempting to download once the sanctions are available.

    Thanks again.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the efforts Don. Much appreciated.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks, Don. One thing that struck me was that the races were all over the map.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks, Don!

          Now, let's see how far we get listing main event winners going back in time. Shall we say, ten a day?

          Starting with a double dose to accomodate Don's addendum:

          2629 non-competitive
          2628 non-competitive
          2627 non-competitive
          2626 cancelled
          2625 Bill Cummings (Sparks-Weirick/Miller) 76.66 mph
          2624 Bob Carey (Meyer/Miller) 90.28 mph
          2623 Wilbur Shaw (Vance/Cragar) 79.49 mph
          2622 Ernie Triplett (White/Miller) 79.66 mph
          2621 Bill Cummings (Sparks-Weirick/Miller) 78.07 mph
          2620 Ernie Triplett (White/Miller) 93.58 mph

          2619 Bill Cummings (Sparks-Weirick/Miller) 80.25 mph
          2618 Bryan Saulpaugh (De Paolo/Miller) 79.15 mph
          2617 Babe Stapp (Quinn/Miller) 67.66 mph
          2616 Ernie Triplett (White/Miller) 79.67 mph
          2615 Bill Cummings (Sparks-Weirick/Miller) 88.42 mph
          2614 Ernie Triplett (White/Miller) 94.16 mph
          2613 Bill Cummings (Sparks-Weirick/Miller) 76.99 mph
          2612 Ernie Triplett (White/Miller) 78.24 mph
          2611 Babe Stapp (Ward/Miller) 80.22 mph
          2610 Francis Quinn (Vance/Cragar) 77.39 mph
          Last edited by Michael Ferner; 11-16-2016, 01:25 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            I would suggest that only with the pairing of at least the listing of events for the International Motor Contest Association (IMCA) during the period covered, in its case 1915-1931, do you really begin to gain a better sense of the presence (and even ubiquity) of automotive contests in the United States during these years. Ideally, I should have continued through to the end of the 1941 season, but this is but one of several very labor-intense and time-consuming research efforts on the table at the moment: there is only so much time in a day. The addition of the events of other sanctioning organizations (CSRA, etc., etc.) would most likely provide a better basis from which to examine the context of US automotive contests during the pre-WW2 years (roughly the first half century of the sport).

            Even from the somewhat limited scope of the AAA sanction lists that have been provided, one begins to sense that there was more activity in various regions than usually thought to be the case by most supposed "auto racing historians." Indeed, several possible avenues of possible historical inquiry easily present themselves from an examination of the sanction listing.

            The listing of sanctions granted by the Contest Board during the period 1932 to 1941 gets a bit more challenging and to use scholarly jargon, "really ugly." However, it is an effort that still needs to be done, but I am quite willing to allow someone else take the lead if at all possible. Frankly, I am sick of staring at a microfilm viewer and the transcribing material related to the sanctions.

            I really, really, really wish that Gordon White had done this ages ago...

            If one cares to take the time and trouble, one can begin to align what Jim O'Keefe has done in his Winners database with the events found in the sanction listing.
            And so we beat on, boats against the current, drawn back ceaselessly into the past ... F. Scott Fitzgerald
            Ever have the feeling that the rest of the world is a tuxedo and you're a pair of brown shoes? ... George Gobel

            Comment


            • #7
              Don, please let me add my thanks to those of the others here for your herculean efforts and generosity in sharing with us.
              Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

              Comment


              • #8
                2609 Bert Karnatz (Miller) 73.71 mph
                2608 Mauri Rose (Vance/Frontenac) 75.50 mph
                2607 Fred Frame (Duesenberg) 80.52 mph
                2606 non-competitive
                2605 Fred Frame (Duesenberg) 89.33 mph
                2604 Fred Frame (Duesenberg) 80.12 mph (over last 25 of 50 laps)
                2603 Billy Winn (Miller/Duesenberg) 75.10 mph
                2602 Bert Ficken (Bagley/Cragar) 78.77 mph
                2601 Harry Campbell (Cacace/Frontenac) 57.96 mph
                2600 Shorty Cantlon (Schneider/Miller) 109.65 mph
                Last edited by Michael Ferner; 11-16-2016, 01:32 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Michael Ferner View Post
                  Thanks, Don!

                  Now, let's see how far we get listing main event winners going back in time. Shall we say, ten a day?

                  2619 Bill Cummings (Sparks/Miller)
                  2618 Bryan Saulpaugh (De Paolo/Miller)
                  2617 Babe Stapp (Quinn/Miller)
                  2616 Ernie Triplett (White/Miller)
                  2615 Bill Cummings (Sparks/Miller)
                  2614 Ernie Triplett (White/Miller)
                  2613 Bill Cummings (Sparks/Miller)
                  2612 Ernie Triplett (White/Miller)
                  2611 Babe Stapp (Ward/Miller)
                  2610 Francis Quinn (Garnant/Cragar)
                  Originally posted by Michael Ferner View Post
                  2609 Bert Karnatz (Miller)
                  2608 Mauri Rose (Vance/Frontenac)
                  2607 Fred Frame (Duesenberg)
                  2606 non-competitive
                  2605 Fred Frame (Duesenberg)
                  2604 Fred Frame (Duesenberg)
                  2603 Billy Winn (Miller/Duesenberg)
                  2602 Bert Ficken (Bagley/Cragar)
                  2601 Harry Campbell (Cacace/Frontenac)
                  2600 Shorty Cantlon (Schneider/Miller)
                  Michael, I assume that these are the winners of the main or feature events for those race meetings. What about the various heat races, consolation, and semi-main events?
                  These types of events almost always seem to get lost in the shuffle. Granted, the main or feature event was the most important event of the race meeting, but qualifying and all the other races provide a context for the final event.

                  A question I would pose to all would be, Should we simply ignore all the other races on the program or attempt to include them? Another query related to this would be more regarding the events, venues, and promoters: how should this information be reflected? Should the listing of an event and its date along with the winner and possible information regarding the machine used by the winner suffice for the record? If so, why? Why is so much attention focused on machinery and drivers, as well as car owners/entrants on occasion, but relatively little or none on the promoters, venues, and the events themselves?

                  As I worked on the sanction listing, along with the other related research on the first 25 years (1895-1920) of automotive contests in the United States, there were many questions that I kept raising as I plowed through the material. Many of them stem from the great attention given to the "low-hanging fruit" and the near-obsession with the machinery and personalities on the track. There seems to be little interest in context and all those squishy, murky things that historians are usually interested in. Granted, of course, the machinery, personalities, and "fruity" so-forth-and-so-on's are important, but that raises the question why this listing of AAA Contest sanctions was not made more widely available prior to this effort? Or, to put another way, why so many stories and so little history?

                  Just a few of the many muses that have crossed my mind lately....
                  Last edited by Don Capps; 12-11-2015, 06:52 PM.
                  And so we beat on, boats against the current, drawn back ceaselessly into the past ... F. Scott Fitzgerald
                  Ever have the feeling that the rest of the world is a tuxedo and you're a pair of brown shoes? ... George Gobel

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by carl s View Post
                    Don, please let me add my thanks to those of the others here for your herculean efforts and generosity in sharing with us.
                    Allow me to echo these thoughts, I am looking forward to diving into this information !

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thank you, Don.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well done, Don.

                        2618 was a great race. The first, of many, for Gilmore...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Don Capps View Post
                          I would suggest that only with the pairing of at least the listing of events for the International Motor Contest Association (IMCA) during the period covered, in its case 1915-1931, do you really begin to gain a better sense of the presence (and even ubiquity) of automotive contests in the United States during these years. Ideally, I should have continued through to the end of the 1941 season, but this is but one of several very labor-intense and time-consuming research efforts on the table at the moment: there is only so much time in a day. The addition of the events of other sanctioning organizations (CSRA, etc., etc.) would most likely provide a better basis from which to examine the context of US automotive contests during the pre-WW2 years (roughly the first half century of the sport).

                          Even from the somewhat limited scope of the AAA sanction lists that have been provided, one begins to sense that there was more activity in various regions than usually thought to be the case by most supposed "auto racing historians." Indeed, several possible avenues of possible historical inquiry easily present themselves from an examination of the sanction listing.

                          The listing of sanctions granted by the Contest Board during the period 1932 to 1941 gets a bit more challenging and to use scholarly jargon, "really ugly." However, it is an effort that still needs to be done, but I am quite willing to allow someone else take the lead if at all possible. Frankly, I am sick of staring at a microfilm viewer and the transcribing material related to the sanctions.

                          I really, really, really wish that Gordon White had done this ages ago...

                          If one cares to take the time and trouble, one can begin to align what Jim O'Keefe has done in his Winners database with the events found in the sanction listing.
                          Originally posted by Don Capps View Post
                          Michael, I assume that these are the winners of the main or feature events for those race meetings. What about the various heat races, consolation, and semi-main events?
                          These types of events almost always seem to get lost in the shuffle. Granted, the main or feature event was the most important event of the race meeting, but qualifying and all the other races provide a context for the final event.

                          A question I would pose to all would be, Should we simply ignore all the other races on the program or attempt to include them? Another query related to this would be more regarding the events, venues, and promoters: how should this information be reflected? Should the listing of an event and its date along with the winner and possible information regarding the machine used by the winner suffice for the record? If so, why? Why is so much attention focused on machinery and drivers, as well as car owners/entrants on occasion, but relatively little or none on the promoters, venues, and the events themselves?

                          As I worked on the sanction listing, along with the other related research on the first 25 years (1895-1920) of automotive contests in the United States, there were many questions that I kept raising as I plowed through the material. Many of them stem from the great attention given to the "low-hanging fruit" and the near-obsession with the machinery and personalities on the track. There seems to be little interest in context and all those squishy, murky things that historians are usually interested in. Granted, of course, the machinery, personalities, and "fruity" so-forth-and-so-on's are important, but that raises the question why this listing of AAA Contest sanctions was not made more widely available prior to this effort? Or, to put another way, why so many stories and so little history?

                          Just a few of the many muses that have crossed my mind lately....

                          Yes, "main event winners" means winners of the main or feature events. Rest assured I don't ignore "all the other races on the program", nor does my interest stop at the winning driver and machine. I could go on and write lengthy articles about, say, the driver and/or car finishing second to last in the 3-lap wheel-changing race, but that's not what I set out to do here, and I'm not compiling a definite record either, so there's no "should we", "how should" or "suffice for the record". It's a fun little project, listing main event winners only, period. And no, followng car and/or engine histories is not exactly "low-hanging fruit", however much you despise it.

                          As to context for this listing per your earlier post, during most of the time covered here the IMCA was merely a travelling circus show along the lines of "professional wrestling" these days, and interest in these "races" is more or less limited to the machinery used. The CSRA was still several years away from gestation, and the "etc., etc." in your post is quite symptomatic for the lack of a handle to tackle the problem: before the advent of the racing boom in the thirties, racing clubs and sanctioning bodies seemed to evolve and then dissolve much like particles in a quantum chaos. Independent ("outlaw") racing existed on a large scale throughout the continent, most of it in a sort of hand-to-mouth form. For a bit of background information and context, [shameless plug] may I suggest reading part 4 of my Reading Fairgounds essay "The Winds of Change" at http://forums.autosport.com/topic/14...nia/?p=5126242 [/shameless plug].

                          Now, back to our regular programming:

                          2599 Ralph de Palma (Miller)
                          2598 George Bailey (Reed-Mulligan/Frontenac)
                          2597 Fred Frame (Duesenberg) 75.60 mph
                          2596 Fred Frame (Duesenberg) 79.39 mph
                          2595 non-competitive
                          2594 Bob Sall (Johnstone/Frontenac)
                          2593 Fred Frame (Duesenberg) 76.85 mph
                          2592 Bill Cummings (Howe/Hispano-Suiza) 76.61 mph
                          2591 Chuck Myers (Studebaker) 43.38 mph
                          2590 cancelled
                          Last edited by Michael Ferner; 11-16-2016, 01:46 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            2589 non-competitive
                            2588 Sam Ross (Reed-Mulligan/Frontenac) 67.74 mph
                            2587 Sam Ross (Reed-Mulligan/Frontenac) 74.69 mph
                            2586 Fred Frame (Duesenberg) 75.94 mph
                            2585 Wilbur Shaw (Miller) no speed
                            2584 Shorty Cantlon (Schneider/Frontenac) 54.71 mph
                            2583 Shorty Cantlon (Schneider/Frontenac) 58.82 mph
                            2582 Billy Winn (Sejnost/Frontenac) 55.86 mph
                            2581 Billy Winn (Sejnost/Frontenac) 74.34 mph
                            2580 non-competitive
                            Last edited by Michael Ferner; 11-16-2016, 01:49 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Michael, it was actually a rhetorical question, of course, more an instance of musing/mumbling aloud for the benefit of others rather than being directed at you. No, I do not "despise" the car/engine histories, rather that there seems to be an inordinate amount of attention given that sort of activity by more than a few that might be better directed elsewhere. The notion of "low-hanging fruit" is quite relative, your often herculean research efforts in particular actually/ironically contributing to some of those now being low-hanging branches for others. Very little of the research into this era is easy, with most that "low-hanging fruit" of dangling somewhere on the fringe of outer space compared to other topics that seem to be endlessly regurgitated and recycled (yes, "formula 1" and "NASCAR/stock car racing," I am talking about you...). And, yes, there is more than a bit of a quandary as to how to frame the questions necessary to really begin to dig into the substance and context of this general period without the usual sort of one-dimensional pieces written by those endlessly describing the elephant's toes while ignoring the rest of the beast. Part of it is how to better frame and integrate the sort of research you excel at, digging up those car/engine histories, into how to provide a better, more measured interpretation of the era. For example, one area of inquiry should be into the very chaotic, turbulent nature of IMCA and other sanctioning bodies/organizations that existed. To dismiss them as "simply" (always a dangerous word to toss about...) being akin to pro wrestling may or may not be an accurate description of them, but certainly that reflects some aspects of the US cultural scene that suggests that something is going on, only what is it?

                              At any rate, what I would suggest is that it is clear that there is much to be done to construct a better basis for examining this period, which I might also suggest as being roughly the first half century of US racing, 1895 to 1941.

                              By the way, Michael, rest assured, those car/engine combinations you keep developing are certainly key parts to this puzzle, providing some of the necessary elements needed to begin to bring some clarity to this era. That there are patterns to be developed and analyzed from this type of data is an important aspect of the overall effort. At some point, we need to find a means for your work to be not only saved, but made available to others.

                              Lastly, one realistic fear/issue/notion is that much of this sort of work might be tossed out in the rubbish or dumped in a few boxes and put away in the attic (or placed on a hard drive that gets reformatted...).
                              And so we beat on, boats against the current, drawn back ceaselessly into the past ... F. Scott Fitzgerald
                              Ever have the feeling that the rest of the world is a tuxedo and you're a pair of brown shoes? ... George Gobel

                              Comment

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