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1961 Eddie Sachs radio interview

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  • 1961 Eddie Sachs radio interview

    http://www.thedirttrackchannel.com/920AM_WTTM_.html

    I was playing online looking for anything about a long gone radio station I once worked for.

    Turns out Eddie Sachs stopped by the studio in 1961

    Enjoy
    Live like Dave

  • #2
    That is a great find. Thanks. 42 cars for a one mile track? I did not know it was that good. I guess they were still having the upright cars trying to race, because the roadsters had taken over.

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    • #3
      Eddie won that race over Herk, both driving dirt cars. The field was about 50-50. Most drivers liked the dirt car over the roadster, because they handled the tighter turns better. At least thats what they said!
      "Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved
      body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting
      "...holy $^!+...what a ride!"
      >

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Niseguy View Post
        Eddie won that race over Herk, both driving dirt cars. The field was about 50-50. Most drivers liked the dirt car over the roadster, because they handled the tighter turns better. At least thats what they said!
        And the weird thing was that some of this "advantage" even carried over into the rear engined era. As late as 1966 Don Branson sat on the front row at Langhorne in a dirt car and ended up finishing 4th. And we all know what Foyt did in a dirt car against rear engined cars at Milwaukee on a couple of occasions as late as 1969. Apparently the way a dirt car worked off of the right rear tire seemed to be the hot ticket on a tight paved mile track; at least for certain drivers. Both the roadsters and the then new rear engined cars took a more balanced chassis approach that required a little more finesse that often worked better on a larger track. At least that's the way it seemed for a few years during the transition to first roadsters and then rear engine cars.

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        • #5
          First time I've heard Eddie Sachs' voice. Funnily enough it sounds exactly as I expected, only slower!
          "An emphasis was placed on drivers with road racing backgrounds which meant drivers from open wheel, oval track racing were at a disadvantage. That led Tony George to create the IRL." -Indy Review 1996

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ensign14 View Post
            First time I've heard Eddie Sachs' voice. Funnily enough it sounds exactly as I expected, only slower!
            There are CDs out there with some of Eddie's after dinner speeches he gave during the early sixties. Thirty, thirty-five years ago, WIBC used to play them on qualification and race weekends. Eddie was, quite frequently, nothing short of hilarious.
            "There is no substitute for victory." - General Douglas MacArthur

            "I love long walks; especially when taken by those who annoy me."

            http://www.flickr.com/photos/impact

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by impact View Post
              There are CDs out there with some of Eddie's after dinner speeches he gave during the early sixties. Thirty, thirty-five years ago, WIBC used to play them on qualification and race weekends. Eddie was, quite frequently, nothing short of hilarious.
              i dont know if its true or urban legend but I read a story once of how he thought he was blinded in a crash at Indy once

              Can anyone verify?
              Live like Dave

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              • #8
                Originally posted by KevMcNJ View Post
                Can anyone verify?
                I can't. But I think it was Brawner writing in his book that Sachs blew an engine and crashed (or stopped, not sure) and was hollering that he was bleeding and that he couldn't see. So someone grabbed a rag and wiped the oil off of his face and out of his eyes, and he was fine. May have been another book, but I think it was Clint Brawner's with Scalzo. (Edit: Ok, ignore, mud, not hurt, and not even when he was with Brawner like I thought.)
                Last edited by Coyote; 09-21-2010, 07:07 AM.
                Got to watch out for those Libertarians - they want to take over the government and leave everyone alone!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by KevMcNJ View Post
                  i dont know if its true or urban legend but I read a story once of how he thought he was blinded in a crash at Indy once

                  Can anyone verify?


                  15 May 1953, per Eddie Sachs speech:

                  “I’m hired to drive the 500 mile race but I’ve got to take my driver’s test. Ten laps at speed. I’m on the 105 mph test. Quickly and easily with my mathematical training, my college education and my knowledge as a racing driver, I figured out is was ridiculous what these other drivers were doing for a 105 mph average speed. All the drivers I’ve been watching lift their foot at the end of the straightaway a coast through the turns. They just get on the gas on the straightaway. It’s ridiculous.”

                  “With paper and pencil, taking the tire size and gear ration, I figured out that 3800 rpm was a 105 mph around the Indianapolis Speedway. When I finished my first phase of the test, they thought I was a genius. Man, I didn’t even get a bad lap.”

                  “Now I went back to the garage. The next test is ten laps at 115 mph. So I get the pencil and paper and figure out that4300 rpm is 115 mph…When you are on the driver’s test you must always stay over on the inside half of the track because the track is open for practice. And I’m way over on the inside. If you’re over against the outside wall, when you get down to the corner, you can turn from the outside, come across the inside kind of skim across the corner. Then you’ll drift back up to the outer wall again. But when you’re on the inside, when you get to the corner, it’s a solid left turn. Man, I got her in there at 4300 rpm and I’m holding her steady. I was going too fast when I entered the third turn and turned left. I knew I had lost control of the car because the first thing I heard was the ’Voice of Firestone’. All of a sudden you hear this eeecccccchhhhhh!!!!!!!!”

                  “Many of the old time drivers had told me if you ever lose control at Indy, get set for it. Get ready to hit that concrete wall because it is a tremendous concussion. Reach down between your legs and grab the s
                  Drive shaft. Boy, I reached down and grabbed the drive shaft. I’m hanging on to it and have my head tucked down. I said to myself, ‘When am I going to hit the wall? When am I going to hit the wall? When am I going to hit the wall? When am I going to hit the wall?’”

                  “That care spun 3 آ½ times, went 565 feet and never hit a thing. It stopped in the infield, perfectly safe, but I didn’t now that. Man, I’m down there waiting to hit that wall. It had rained the night before and the infield was a muddy, soggy mess. I’m spinning and the mud is coming through the cockpit of the car. There I was, a mass of mud.”

                  “When the yellow light went on, ELKNOC was driving the ambulance this day. I better explain who ELKNOC is. It’s really John Conkly, the funeral home director in Indianapolis. If you spell his name backwards, it’s ELKNOC. He said to me later, ‘Eddie,. When the yellow light went on, I ran to the ambulance, threw the key on, let the clutch fly and took off. As I’m tearing out of the pits I heard someone holler, ‘It’s Sachs.’ ‘Oh Eddie, when I heard it was you, my drinking buddy, I quickly went through the number one turn and I’m on the short straightaway and I’m looking for you. Ole ELKNOC is looking for you. I’m looking for my drinking buddy. Now I’m going down the back straight and I’m looking for you Eddie. All of a sudden I looked down at the speedometer and it read a 100 miles per hour! Eddie, I just lifted my foot from the gas, punched the brake, slowed the ambulance down and said to myself, ‘He’s not worth it.’”

                  “He went through the number three turn, across the short chute and I’m parked in the infield. He drove the ambulance over to my race car, threw the door open, jumped out and ran over to me. An I’m down there waiting to hit the wall. He taps me on the shoulder and hollers, ‘Are you ok?’ It snapped me out of my reverie and I realized I was ok.”

                  “Boy, I pushed myself back up and sat up straight in the cockpit. From my helmet straight down, I’m a solid mass of mud. I looked up towards the straightaway, then left, then right. I looked up towards the sky and I hollered, ‘I’m blind, I’m blind! I can’t see. I can’t see! And he said, ‘You dumb S.O.B., take your goggles off!!!’”
                  "There is no substitute for victory." - General Douglas MacArthur

                  "I love long walks; especially when taken by those who annoy me."

                  http://www.flickr.com/photos/impact

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for that, it was a great read.

                    Failed to mention, but, when I followed IndyCars back then, Mr. Eddie Sachs was my favorite driver.

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