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Bob Sharp Racing Team V8 280ZX

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  • Bob Sharp Racing Team V8 280ZX

    I've heard that Bob Sharp exploited a 1970s IMSA Camel GT series loophole to build a 280ZX with a V8 engine from another car in the Datsun/Nissan Japanese home-market lineup. Anybody have stats, history or photos of this car?

    I've always thought it'd be fun to have a 1970s Z-car with flared fenders, fat tires, a blade spoiler and an aluminum Chevy small-block under the hood.
    "Only a fool fights in a burning house."-Kang

    "If you listen to fools....The Maaahhhhb Ruuuules....."-Ronnie James Dio

  • #2
    I remember the car, saw it a few times. Had a Nissan v8 and was a twin turbo, if I'm not mistaken. PLN ran the car in Trans Am, we put the radar gun on it at Road Atlanta and it was a TON faster than the others on the long straight.

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    • #3
      Was this the car? BTW I love those wheel fans. I need a set for my car.


      Skypigeon "If you're not on the bus, don't whine about the direction it's going."

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      • #4
        Go to Hybridz.org Search Bob sharp
        PAY NO MORE.
        Be there or be square.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Sea Fury
          I've heard that Bob Sharp exploited a 1970s IMSA Camel GT series loophole to build a 280ZX with a V8 engine from another car in the Datsun/Nissan Japanese home-market lineup. Anybody have stats, history or photos of this car?

          I've always thought it'd be fun to have a 1970s Z-car with flared fenders, fat tires, a blade spoiler and an aluminum Chevy small-block under the hood.

          BMW did kind of the same in 2001: The M3 was given a V8 of the same company (BMW) and it was made legal with the statement that is was kind of a prototype, preceeding the production run of 25 street legal cars, to be built in the future. One prototype of that street leagl car was built but production postponed all the time up until after the IMSA title was won.
          Porsche then protested the car and the rules were changed. Pre-production prototype cars of future cars to be built shortly or not built in sufficient numbers were handicapped by either carrying more weight and/or smaller air restrictors in order to bring them down on power.
          BMW was furiuos as the M3V8 lost its competive edge over the Porsche GT3 cars it had humiliated the year before and instantly withdrew from IMSA
          And the promised production version of the M3 V8 never went into production...
          Effectively making the 2001 IMS title they won a farce and one of the biggest cheats in any championship. They won the title in what was the stepstone `baby`GT category for the more cheaper and affordable GT cars, built in larger numbers. That category was supposed to be for genuine production GT cars. But the championship large volume Production GT car never ever went into production!
          I have understood that there were less BMW M3 V8 cars built for race cars and production cars combined then from the MultiMillion Dollar BMW powered McLaren F1 GTR `longtail` GT car, used in 1998 in the FIA GT series... That car was at least for sale and was sold too....

          So many hit out about Porsche cheating the GT rules with the 1996 911GT1. But at least that car was indeed for sale in 1997 as promised (and a dead horse in competition by then....) and built in larger numbers then that BMW M3 V8....

          Indyote

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Indyote
            BMW did kind of the same in 2001: The M3 was given a V8 of the same company (BMW) and it was made legal with the statement that is was kind of a prototype, preceeding the production run of 25 street legal cars, to be built in the future. One prototype of that street leagl car was built but production postponed all the time up until after the IMSA title was won.
            Porsche then protested the car and the rules were changed. Pre-production prototype cars of future cars to be built shortly or not built in sufficient numbers were handicapped by either carrying more weight and/or smaller air restrictors in order to bring them down on power.
            BMW was furiuos as the M3V8 lost its competive edge over the Porsche GT3 cars it had humiliated the year before and instantly withdrew from IMSA
            And the promised production version of the M3 V8 never went into production...
            Effectively making the 2001 IMS title they won a farce and one of the biggest cheats in any championship. They won the title in what was the stepstone `baby`GT category for the more cheaper and affordable GT cars, built in larger numbers. That category was supposed to be for genuine production GT cars. But the championship large volume Production GT car never ever went into production!
            I have understood that there were less BMW M3 V8 cars built for race cars and production cars combined then from the MultiMillion Dollar BMW powered McLaren F1 GTR `longtail` GT car, used in 1998 in the FIA GT series... That car was at least for sale and was sold too....

            So many hit out about Porsche cheating the GT rules with the 1996 911GT1. But at least that car was indeed for sale in 1997 as promised (and a dead horse in competition by then....) and built in larger numbers then that BMW M3 V8....

            Indyote
            I always thought that the "GT" category should be for series-produced cars with 100 or more built, as in back in the 60s.

            In terms of Sharp's car, you have to remember what 70s IMSA was like. You had the "All American GT" class that had some insane machinery. Holbert's small block Monza was about as normal as it got; the Greenwood big block Vettes, Mo Carter's 500CI Camaro, the Hemi Challenger I posted about a while back, Kemp's Boss 429 Mustang II...very cool stuff.
            "It was actually fun, because you're back fully driving again in these trucks. Ninety percent of the tracks we go to in the IRL, you're flat-out. I was having to lift off the corners some here." - Buddy Rice

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Racewriter
              I always thought that the "GT" category should be for series-produced cars with 100 or more built, as in back in the 60s.

              In terms of Sharp's car, you have to remember what 70s IMSA was like. You had the "All American GT" class that had some insane machinery. Holbert's small block Monza was about as normal as it got; the Greenwood big block Vettes, Mo Carter's 500CI Camaro, the Hemi Challenger I posted about a while back, Kemp's Boss 429 Mustang II...very cool stuff.
              The only info I can find on the Charlie Kemp Mustang has it powered by a fuel-injected 351 Cleveland....



              Boss 429 (stock):

              "Only a fool fights in a burning house."-Kang

              "If you listen to fools....The Maaahhhhb Ruuuules....."-Ronnie James Dio

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              • #8
                IIRC, it had both. My '76 Daytona 24 Hours program indicates that it was designed to run with both engines, depending on the track. I guess I don't have any evidence that it actually competed with the Boss.
                "It was actually fun, because you're back fully driving again in these trucks. Ninety percent of the tracks we go to in the IRL, you're flat-out. I was having to lift off the corners some here." - Buddy Rice

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sea Fury

                  Boss 429 (stock):

                  those plugs look easy enough to change

                  Is that distributor missing a vacuum hose or is it intentionally missing?
                  Live like Dave

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