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Lion Air 737 Max Story

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  • Lion Air 737 Max Story

    I posted this on a CE topic, but on second thought, maybe here would be better. A lengthy read and behind a paywall if you've used all your free access.


    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/18/m...gtype=Homepage
    On Oct. 29, 2018, Lion Air Flight 610 taxied toward the runway at the main airport in Jakarta, Indonesia, carrying 189 people bound for Bangka Island, a short flight away. The airplane was the latest version of the Boeing 737, a gleaming new 737 Max that was delivered merely three months before. The captain was a 31-year-old Indian named Bhavye Suneja, who did his initial flight training at a small and now-defunct school in San Carlos, Calif., and opted for an entry-level job with Lion Air in 2011. Lion Air is an aggressive airline that dominates the rapidly expanding Indonesian market in low-cost air travel and is one of Boeing’s largest customers worldwide. It is known for hiring inexperienced pilots — most of them recent graduates of its own academy — and for paying them little and working them hard. Pilots like Suneja who come from the outside typically sign on in the hope of building hours and moving on to a better job. Lion Air gave him some simulator time and a uniform, put him into the co-pilot’s seat of a 737 and then made him a captain sooner than a more conventional airline would have. Nonetheless, by last Oct. 29, Suneja had accumulated 6,028 hours and 45 minutes of flight time, so he was no longer a neophyte. On the coming run, it would be his turn to do the flying.

    His co-pilot was an Indonesian 10 years his elder who went by the single name Harvino and had nearly the same flight experience. On this leg, he would handle the radio communications. No reference has been made to Harvino’s initial flight training. He had accumulated about 900 hours of flight time when he was hired by Lion Air. Like thousands of new pilots now meeting the demands for crews — especially those in developing countries with rapid airline growth — his experience with flying was scripted, bounded by checklists and cockpit mandates and dependent on autopilots. He had some rote knowledge of cockpit procedures as handed down from the big manufacturers, but he was weak in an essential quality known as airmanship. Sadly, his captain turned out to be weak in it, too.

    “Airmanship” is an anachronistic word, but it is applied without prejudice to women as well as men. Its full meaning is difficult to convey. It includes a visceral sense of navigation, an operational understanding of weather and weather information, the ability to form mental maps of traffic flows, fluency in the nuance of radio communications and, especially, a deep appreciation for the interplay between energy, inertia and wings. Airplanes are living things. The best pilots do not sit in cockpits so much as strap them on. The United States Navy manages to instill a sense of this in its fledgling fighter pilots by ramming them through rigorous classroom instruction and then requiring them to fly at bank angles without limits, including upside down. The same cannot be expected of airline pilots who never fly solo and whose entire experience consists of catering to passengers who flinch in mild turbulence, refer to “air pockets” in cocktail conversation and think they are near death if bank angles exceed 30 degrees. The problem exists for many American and European pilots, too. Unless they make extraordinary efforts — for instance, going out to fly aerobatics, fly sailplanes or wander among the airstrips of backcountry Idaho — they may never develop true airmanship no matter the length of their careers. The worst of them are intimidated by their airplanes and remain so until they retire or die. It is unfortunate that those who die in cockpits tend to take their passengers with them.
    It's a Hoosier thing, you wouldn't understand...

  • #2
    That is not correct. Every plane lands at the hand of a pilot. Every part of the world has weather. Pilots have to land in rain and crosswinds where all the automation does not help. Auto pilot is on for the majority of the flight but not when it matters.

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    • #3
      A basic introduction to Autoland systems.

      "Autoland: When pilots can't see the runway" https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/a...way/index.html
      "I would really like to go to NASCAR. I really enjoy NASCAR and if I could be there in a couple of years that's where I'd want to be." - Jeff Gordon (after testing a Formula Super Vee)

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RS2 View Post
        That is not correct. Every plane lands at the hand of a pilot. Every part of the world has weather. Pilots have to land in rain and crosswinds where all the automation does not help. Auto pilot is on for the majority of the flight but not when it matters.
        A FedEx 747 pilot told me he often landed in Anchorage when he could not see the ground. "You feel the wheels hit, then the nose rotates and then you see the runway." That sounds pretty easy, I said, just leave it up to the computer. He gave a short laugh, "You haven't lived until you get one of those big bastards sideways sliding down the runway, steering with the throttles." He could not wait to retire and he did at age 60, moved back to Kentucky.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Jim Wilke View Post

          A FedEx 747 pilot told me he often landed in Anchorage when he could not see the ground. "You feel the wheels hit, then the nose rotates and then you see the runway." That sounds pretty easy, I said, just leave it up to the computer. He gave a short laugh, "You haven't lived until you get one of those big bastards sideways sliding down the runway, steering with the throttles." He could not wait to retire and he did at age 60, moved back to Kentucky.
          Sounds similar to an old United 747 captain once told me flying into Kai Tak.
          RIP Dan Wheldon :(

          "Anybody who says the IndyCar Series is not the best championship in the world is a complete idiot in my book." ~Dan Wheldon


          "It's a discussion board, not a society ball." ~Skypigeon

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          • #6
            Auto land is not available everywhere. The autoland airports are not in densely populated areas.

            Frankfort Germany has the required instrumentation. I was a passenger on 1 auto land flight. The plane touches down before you see the ground as explained earlier in the thread. (747)
            "Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved
            body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting
            "...holy $^!+...what a ride!"
            >

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