Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

EVs now outsell stick shifts

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • EVs now outsell stick shifts

    https://www.autoblog.com/2019/11/07/...united-states/

  • #2
    Manuals have gone the way of the black and white TV.

    Comment


    • #3
      It's been debated/discussed here before but that's a dang shame. I had dinner with a group
      the other day. One guy just got back from 3 weeks in Italy. He couldn't stop talking about how
      much fun he had driving a manual car around.
      "The Internet. Where fools go to feel important" - Sir Charles Barkley

      Comment


      • #4
        It's hard to find a new car with a manual transmission any more. It's getting easier to find Teslas and Leafs and such.

        Here's Ford trying to have it both ways... sort of...
        "I didn't hear a single comment about airboxes, "carbashians", or how terrible the car looked. I did see dozens and dozens of little kids in awe of the speed and how cool the cars looked. We should learn from our children."
        --Danny Noonan

        Comment


        • #5
          I've had a lot of fun driving cars with standard transmissions but now have zero interest. I still like referring to them as theft deterrents.
          Center Grove Trojans
          2008 5A Football State Champs
          2015 6A Football State Champs
          2011 Track State Champs

          Center Grove Jr. Trojans
          2014, 2015 & 2017 IEFA State Champs

          Comment


          • #6
            Enthusiasts are the only people seeking out a proper manual transmission and their days are numbered. It also doesn't help that many high performance cars have abandoned them as well.

            Comment


            • #7
              Love driving manual transmissions in the UK; but after a week or so, the novelty begins to wear off. Seriously considering a PHEV for my next car.
              DVR . . . . Life is too short to watch commercials.

              Comment


              • #8
                Back in the early 80s the US military determined that many of the incoming recruits couldn't drive manual transmissions and it was a major waste of time training them to do so. Also some of the women struggled with the required force and stroke length of a truck clutch pedal. They started procuring pretty much all their new vehicle platforms with automatics. We made a lot of money at Allison from this.
                Road racing is doomed...what this country needs is a big new racetrack designed for automobiles instead of horses. C.G. Fisher

                Comment


                • #9
                  No mystery as to why manual transmissions are waning. If you live in a densely populated area (where most Americans do live these days) with heavy traffic you'll end up shifting as frequently as a driver during the 24 Hours Of The Nurburgring. Few people want to put up with that and I don't blame them.
                  The Ayn Rand of Indycar

                  No one had to badge the Offy.

                  Crapping all over threads since 2000.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yep. My Nissan has an auto manual transmission. Just as fun without the hassle.
                    Center Grove Trojans
                    2008 5A Football State Champs
                    2015 6A Football State Champs
                    2011 Track State Champs

                    Center Grove Jr. Trojans
                    2014, 2015 & 2017 IEFA State Champs

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Most Americans don't know how to shift gears anyway. Even in heavy trucks automatics are now the norm. Easier on the legs and knee joints. Hence why auto racing needs to adapt to the current technology.
                      "Lead,follow or get the hell out of the way!

                      Lee Iacocca

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Auto racing needs to adapt? Who beides NASCAR still does not have the shift levers on the steering wheel?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The primary reason there are less and less offered vs. just generally lower demand for the usual reasons of traffic, skill, being American, other tech, etc. is US market emission compliance is very difficult for automakers to meet without causing rev hang due to being measured by peak emissions, not the total.

                          i.e accelerate and then grab the next gear, many cars will have the rpms not drop quick to the next gear, but hang and drop slowly. It kills all momentum and defeats the efficiency advantage and makes the driving experience annoying.

                          Rev hang is done to avoid hydrocarbon and NOx spikes between gears, because not having closed loop between the engine and gearbox does not provide the anticipation when it will happen - that is up to the driver, not part of the computer. The slow drop in rpms burns off the spike.

                          Aftermarket tunes gets rid of some this. European regs do not focus as much on the spike, so not as an issue, there, but it does exist to a lesser degree.

                          This affects all transmissions, but manuals more because the engine and the gearbox and not tuned together.

                          You can notice it in some automatics with torque converters, there is a momentary retarding of the ignition and a slight shift delay between gears, particularly when using manual mode.

                          The Constant Velocity Transmission - CVT (the belt or toroidal type used in Nissans, Subarus, Hondas, etc, not the hybrid car gear type in Prius) only exists because it minimizes the hydrocarbon spike by burning it off with the changes in speed vs. rpm with downside of the rubber band effect of laggy response and reliability long term. Automakers use them for emission compliance and slightly better city driving mpgs vs. an automatic, but not on the highway. A manual is still more efficient with the same final drive gear ratio and acceleration times normalized. The driving experience is pretty poor and has been avoided by automakers until they have limited options to comply with regulation.

                          The big question long term is how durable 8-10 speed torque converter automatics and CVTs will be beyond 100,000 miles. More gears are used for slightly higher fuel economy on the EPA tests, but not likely that real world mpgs are better than 6-speed automatics due to different drive cycles. Lower speed automatics maintained could run for years and 100,000s of miles. Automotive CVTs do not have a good track record long term - and are not repairable/rebuildable.

                          I disagree with racing going to current "technology". All of these transmissions have existed for decades. They should go with what has the best performance and efficiency to the wheels to race. That is manuals or paddled shifted manuals. Automatics are not used in racing due to efficiency and gear selection not being always optimal. If something better comes along, then use it. Williams F1 tested a external rubber belt CVT in the 90s and it was banned by the FIA, but also is poor for driveability.

                          I have to laugh - I saw a brand new Jeep Wrangler 4 door with a 6-speed manual and it had a large stick with cartoon of the shift pattern and said, "Millennial anti-theft device".

                          The electric car gets rid of the emission thing, the transmission lag and tuning, and driver skill in planning gear shifts with no downside. I drove a Tesla and some others and it is weird to have instant race car like throttle response again in a road car.

                          I have a feeling the EV and its variants will leapfrog the ever impossible task to meet the diminishing returns of emissions regulations for engines. Engines are already 99.9+% cleaner now and it costs a lot in development cost, efficiency (more gas) and performance to meet very, very small amounts of emissions benefit.
                          And don't forget the heat!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by RS2 View Post
                            Auto racing needs to adapt? Who beides NASCAR still does not have the shift levers on the steering wheel?
                            Those series that limit transmission technology. Spec racing does not permit technologies to advance. There are more and more companies looking to develop better transmission ideas. What can come from racing may find its way into other industries. It simply needs to be allowed and let the market forces work to provide the best technologies.
                            "Lead,follow or get the hell out of the way!

                            Lee Iacocca

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              All the big companies are already in racing. Name one not.

                              Comment

                              Unconfigured Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X