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The Arrogance of NASCAR

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  • The Arrogance of NASCAR

    The other day, it struck me that the opening prayer before some of the races is complete and total arrogance, and a clear indication of what NASCAR continues to represent in this county...some psuedo, vanilla, "NASCAR Mom", cultural phenom, that seems to be predicated on intolerance, xenophobia, and a culture that looks on the surface designed to set us back 30 years.

    I am a devout Catholic.

    But to end a prayer in front on 100,000+ people, whom if representive of this country would be Muslims, Jews, Catholics, Budhists, and Hindus, "we ask this of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ"...

    It is the height of arrogance.

  • #2
    sorry but this country is a christian based society.. we welcome other religions but this will always be a christian society.. nice try tho
    "Paff has been closer to the mark than anyone will give him credit for."

    Richard Kimble 11/18/2010

    "Paff is far more right than any of you will EVER give him credit for.

    As non politically correct and un IndyCar friendly as it is, it's the truth. "

    SeeuInMay 12/29/2010

    Comment


    • #3
      Gabbiano,

      Just FYI, NASCAR has nothing at all to do with who, from what religious denomination, offers the innvocation.
      That is up to the individual track owner/manager/promoter, but I guess it's easier for uniformed fans to blame the sanctioning body for every detail instead of taking a bit of time to educate themselves?

      It appears that would be the case.
      Think about where you're going in life...
      You may already be there!
      boB

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      • #4
        Gabbiano, as a reminder - we are "One nation, under God"
        Dwight Clock

        Comment


        • #5
          I predict this thread will be locked.

          What rlm says is exactly correct. NASCAR has nothing to do with the selection of what preacher prays or what he says.

          I know that at Pocono, the Mattiolis always have a Roman Catholic priest. I have seen a great diversity of protestants, and occasionally Catholics, elsewhere. Wide divergence of denomonations.

          Exactly how many Budhists do you think attend Darlington?

          Comment


          • #6
            A couple of years ago a Rabbi presided over the Convocation before the BY400. It's up the track owner/promoter and once the person gets in front of the mic noone has any control over what is said.

            The Reverend Hal Marchman does the Convocations for Daytona and he includes a "Shalom" in there and otherwise keeps his speeches as non-Christian only as he can.

            Let's not judge NASCAR by one speech by one person. I've heard many Convocations before NASCAR races by clergy from several demoninations that were tasteful and respectful to everyone in attendence.
            The Ayn Rand of Indycar

            No one had to badge the Offy.

            Crapping all over threads since 2000.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by dwcremax
              Gabbiano, as a reminder - we are "One nation, under God"
              actually, I think it's "One nation under God"
              Life's too short to worry/Life's too long to wait
              Too short not to love everybody/Life's too long to hate

              "There are a number of very knowledgeable and entertaining race fans here. There are also a number of morons. Your job is to figure out which is which." - Rev-Ed

              Comment


              • #8
                I am correct. The phrase "under God" was added in 1954 after a campaign by the Knights of Columbus and other religious leaders. It includes the comma. For reference go to www.firstamendment.org
                Dwight Clock

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by dwcremax
                  I am correct. The phrase "under God" was added in 1954 after a campaign by the Knights of Columbus and other religious leaders. It includes the comma. For reference go to www.firstamendment.org
                  I had a high school history teach that made sure we didn't pause between Nation and under when we recited the Pledge. Here's some things that back up the no comma thing.

                  here shows no comma:
                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pledge_of_Allegiance

                  I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America , and to The Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.


                  Congress considers three variations of the "under God" phrase:

                  1. "One Nation under God,"
                  2. "One Nation, under God," and
                  3. "One Nation indivisible under God."

                  Congress accepts variation #1 based on a recommendation from the Library of Congress, which states, "Since the basic idea is a Nation founded on a belief in God, there would seem to be no reason for the comma after Nation."

                  The words "under God" are inserted into the Pledge. The legislation is supported by President Dwight D. Eisenhower, "fearing an atomic war between the U.S. and the Soviet Union," who signs the bill. President Eisenhower says: "In this way we are reaffirming the transcendence of religious faith in America's heritage and future; in this way we shall constantly strengthen those spiritual weapons which forever will be our country's most powerful resource in peace and war." The new Pledge reads:

                  "I Pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all." 4



                  In 1954, Louis C. Rabaut put forward a resolution that proposed the addition of the words "under God" as "one nation, under God" to distinguish Americans from the Godless communists. After a debate about the comma, the Library of Congress reported the following recommendation:

                  "...Under the generally accepted rules of grammar, a modifier should normally be placed as close as possible to the word it modifies. In the present instance, this would indicate that the phrase 'under God,' being intended as a fundamental and basic characterization of our Nation, might well be put immediately following the word 'Nation.' Further, since the basic idea is a Nation founded on a belief in God, there would seem to be no reason for a comma after Nation; 'one Nation under God' thus becomes a single phrase, emphasizing precisely the idea desired by the authors...

                  source
                  Life's too short to worry/Life's too long to wait
                  Too short not to love everybody/Life's too long to hate

                  "There are a number of very knowledgeable and entertaining race fans here. There are also a number of morons. Your job is to figure out which is which." - Rev-Ed

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DaveL
                    A couple of years ago a Rabbi presided over the Convocation before the BY400. It's up the track owner/promoter and once the person gets in front of the mic noone has any control over what is said.

                    The Reverend Hal Marchman does the Convocations for Daytona and he includes a "Shalom" in there and otherwise keeps his speeches as non-Christian only as he can.

                    Let's not judge NASCAR by one speech by one person. I've heard many Convocations before NASCAR races by clergy from several demoninations that were tasteful and respectful to everyone in attendence.
                    Hey
                    at least with NASCAR there's enough gathered in the stands for minion
                    Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Bever911 - Based on your findings and mine we could discuss this forever and come to no definitive conclusion. I respect your findings and your opinion.
                      Dwight Clock

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by dwcremax
                        Bever911 - Based on your findings and mine we could discuss this forever and come to no definitive conclusion. I respect your findings and your opinion.
                        you're website doesn't work for me, I'd like to see your findings.
                        Life's too short to worry/Life's too long to wait
                        Too short not to love everybody/Life's too long to hate

                        "There are a number of very knowledgeable and entertaining race fans here. There are also a number of morons. Your job is to figure out which is which." - Rev-Ed

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Gabbiano
                          The other day, it struck me that the opening prayer before some of the races is complete and total arrogance, and a clear indication of what NASCAR continues to represent in this county...some psuedo, vanilla, "NASCAR Mom", cultural phenom, that seems to be predicated on intolerance, xenophobia, and a culture that looks on the surface designed to set us back 30 years.

                          I am a devout Catholic.

                          But to end a prayer in front on 100,000+ people, whom if representive of this country would be Muslims, Jews, Catholics, Budhists, and Hindus, "we ask this of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ"...

                          It is the height of arrogance.


                          I disagree. I think the height of ignorance these day's is the total intolerence to anything that mentions God.

                          It is the culture that ignores what their 12 year old is watching on MTV for hours a day but jumps up when they hear there was a prayer at the school before a soccer game.

                          I do personally like it better when the prayer is more generic, like at the 500 each May, but I seriously believe the intolerance has shifted from the religious to the non the last 30 years.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The race is taking place on private property, run by a private organization, attended by people who paid admission to enter.

                            In addition, the vast majority of participants (if not all) favor that type of Invocation. If it's a public ceremony on the National Mall, your complaint would have some merit. However, under the circumstances it occured, the arguement hold no water.
                            Doctorindy.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              You must have been the guy sitting next to me at the USGP last summer. He refused to stand during the invocation or the National Anthem, and then made it a point to bad mouth both. Behold, the "arrogance" of F1.
                              It's a Hoosier thing, you wouldn't understand...

                              Comment

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