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Beers That Changed America

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  • #16
    Greatest slogan of all time:

    Schaefer-beer-slogan-sign.jpg

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    • #17
      When I was in college (University of Cincinnati) in the mid 60's near my apartment on Ludlow Avenue, there was a walk down basement tiny pub. A distributor dropped off a case of Schlitz beer from Milwaukee for the pub owner to try. He didn't know what to do with it. His local customers were not interested. I was probably the only one who knew about Schlitz in his pub. I made him a deal. I would drink it for a discount of his normal price of bottled beer to take it off his hands. For the next month or so, I was the only one to drink it. I thought it was better than the Hudepohl, Schoenling, Burger and Wiedemann local beers. No one found out. Short lived, but enjoyable.
      Davydd (Anglicized Welsh name for David...that's all)
      Certified BPT Taster Pursuing Pork Tenderloin Sandwiches
      Long lost Speedway Sparkplug thrashing about in the deep woods of Minnesota

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Davydd View Post
        When I was in college (University of Cincinnati) in the mid 60's near my apartment on Ludlow Avenue, there was a walk down basement tiny pub. A distributor dropped off a case of Schlitz beer from Milwaukee for the pub owner to try. He didn't know what to do with it. His local customers were not interested. I was probably the only one who knew about Schlitz in his pub. I made him a deal. I would drink it for a discount of his normal price of bottled beer to take it off his hands. For the next month or so, I was the only one to drink it. I thought it was better than the Hudepohl, Schoenling, Burger and Wiedemann local beers. No one found out. Short lived, but enjoyable.
        That's odd, as Schlitz was one of the top selling beers for decades, including around that time.
        Eff LBD!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by mstove View Post

          That's odd, as Schlitz was one of the top selling beers for decades, including around that time.
          It was not distributed and sold in Cincinnati, perhaps because of those breweries I mentioned, Hudepohl, Schoenling, Burger and Wiedemann, all local breweries, had a stranglehold on distribution. That case of Schlitz might have been an effort to penetrate the market. I knew about Schlitz because it was distributed in Indianapolis. The only beer I remember in Indianapolis from Cincinnati (on the Kentucky side) was Wiedemann. My beer of choice back then was Carling Black Label. In fact I painted it on my Speedway High School senior cords.

          What Me Worry Senior Cords.jpg
          Davydd (Anglicized Welsh name for David...that's all)
          Certified BPT Taster Pursuing Pork Tenderloin Sandwiches
          Long lost Speedway Sparkplug thrashing about in the deep woods of Minnesota

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          • #20
            Who takes a month to drink a case of beer? That case, or any, for that matter wouldn't last me more than a few days, sometimes one day, at best

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            • #21
              Originally posted by mfatty500 View Post
              Who takes a month to drink a case of beer? That case, or any, for that matter wouldn't last me more than a few days, sometimes one day, at best
              I took my time to savor that case knowing it might be all mine having just one per visit.
              Davydd (Anglicized Welsh name for David...that's all)
              Certified BPT Taster Pursuing Pork Tenderloin Sandwiches
              Long lost Speedway Sparkplug thrashing about in the deep woods of Minnesota

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              • #22
                What I don't like is Samuel Adams. Like Heinz, it has 57 varities. I shy from buying a six pack because it might be lousy to my taste, and that would be wasted money. So I stick to my favorite brands.

                ==

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Davydd View Post

                  But it didn't. Shiner was a regional beer to Texas and not very well known outside of Texas. It does have a certain nostalgia in my heart. First in the 70s in designing Target Stores in Texas, in trying to catch a plane on a Friday afternoon in rush hour, I noticed Texans were not unnerved in stalled traffic sipping on those long neck bottles. It was legal back then. I next encountered Shiner Bock long neck bottles in the 80s visiting Fuddrucker's restaurants and seeing the cases of beer for customers to queue up for hamburgers and of course partake while waiting. I was the architect of record for the first Target Stores in Texas and the first Fuddrucker's restaurants outside of Texas.

                  I noticed last year in South Padre Island, Texas beach bars, Shiner Bock was listed as an imported beer. I did ask. It was because they could charge more for it.
                  Those are the bars you should skip. Although I haven't made it down to South Padre, so maybe they're all like that. If so, I'll skip the bars and just bring a cooler.

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                  • #24
                    I got introduced to other beers from roommates back in the old days who were from PA. Back the smaller breweries were regional and only the large scale brewers crossed state lines. In STL you were expected to drink A/B beers despite them not being the best. Some of the beers I got introduced to:

                    Mickeys
                    Rolling Rock
                    Straubs (good beer)
                    Schaefers
                    Genne Cream Ale
                    Iron City (yechh)
                    and a couple more I can’t remember.

                    My brother brought back a selection of German beers when he came back after being stationed in West Germany in the mid 80’s.
                    The most notable being a couple bottles of EKU 28. At the time the strongest alcohol content beer in the world. It was not to be drunk straight, you wanted it down and the taste was pretty awful.
                    Trump, he's one of the nicest, most decent human beings possibly ever to walk the planet..

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Davydd View Post

                      It was not distributed and sold in Cincinnati, perhaps because of those breweries I mentioned, Hudepohl, Schoenling, Burger and Wiedemann, all local breweries, had a stranglehold on distribution. That case of Schlitz might have been an effort to penetrate the market. I knew about Schlitz because it was distributed in Indianapolis. The only beer I remember in Indianapolis from Cincinnati (on the Kentucky side) was Wiedemann. My beer of choice back then was Carling Black Label. In fact I painted it on my Speedway High School senior cords.

                      What Me Worry Senior Cords.jpg
                      In the mid 60’s my Dad was a marketing guy for the brewing company that produced Carling and Stag beer. They were based in St.Louis at the time. I’ve still got some unusual Carling Black Label items in my house.
                      Trump, he's one of the nicest, most decent human beings possibly ever to walk the planet..

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                      • #26
                        Falstaff was popular in Indiana. Everybody poured salt into it tho...

                        Rainer in Washington and Oregon. Hamm's in minnesota, Ortlibe's in Philadelphia as well as Schmidt's of Philadelphia.
                        "Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved
                        body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting
                        "...holy $^!+...what a ride!"
                        >

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                        • #27
                          Yuengling - Gets an award for staying alive, I suppose.

                          Coors - As mentioned above, prior to the 1970s or so, beer was a regional brand. Bud, Schlitz and others existed, but, kind of like bread or milk today, the brand names changed if you got a state or two away from home. But the cost of national advertising was way less than local advertising. Coors, which had a massive market share where it did do business, and a cult smuggling base elsewhere, watched dozens and dozens of other brands go under and fought back with a national roll out. The rest is history.

                          Schlitz - Before Miller and Coors, Bud's big competitor was Schlitz. Much like NASCAR, the new generation ruined the golden goose. In Schlitz's case, the idiot grandson was Robert Uihlein, Jr., who cost cut to the point that the beer was undrinkable product and several recalls. Killed the brand. Today exists as a part of the Pabst "virtual brewery" deal (see below).

                          Pabst - Another near national brand that Bud and Miller/Coors/Molson killed. Today the PBR is a cult thing, but Pabst is the "virtual brewery". It bought up three dozen former national and regional brands and pays MCM to brew them for it, with no brewing capacity of its own. Whether any of these is actually close to the original is a matter of opinion.

                          Bud - The king. No discussion of American beer can be had without A-B. There are several good books on the idiot, in this case, great great, grandson and his loss of the company to ImBev. Sad tale.

                          Iron City - One of the few regional brands to have survived. Indistinguishable from Bud, IMHO.

                          Lite - The marketing masterstroke of the 1970s. "Diet" beers, aimed at women, had been tried before, but by featuring retired athletes (it was illegal to use current athletes in beer ads back then) and faded male celebrities, Miller created a segment, which every brand copied. The orignal Miller High Life is an after thought today, as is nearly Original Coors, and Bud Light outsells Bud.

                          Sam Adams - The marketing masterstroke of the 1980s. Not really related to the historical Sam Adams, and made all over the country, currently in Cincinnati and Portland, OR, but never in commercial quantities in Boston, Koch sells a mass produced, but grossly over-hopped, beer as some kind of premium beer. This, and all its imitators, which make up the rest of the list, appeal to people who really don't like beer.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by SamC View Post
                            Schlitz - Before Miller and Coors, Bud's big competitor was Schlitz. Much like NASCAR, the new generation ruined the golden goose. In Schlitz's case, the idiot grandson was Robert Uihlein, Jr., who cost cut to the point that the beer was undrinkable product and several recalls. Killed the brand. Today exists as a part of the Pabst "virtual brewery" deal (see below).
                            Schlitz back in the 60s I alluded too was evidently before the cost cutting. A few years ago (I don't know if it is still promoted today) the brewer had a fanfare promotion of bringing back the original formula for Schlitz, but strangely in just the long-necked bottles but not the cans. So, I bought a six pack and, yes, it was the original distinctive taste as I remembered it and compared to the can beer sold at the same time was entirely different. I'm indifferent to most all national brands. With over 7,000 breweries now making almost any style of beer desired, I partake only them as I will never run out of surprise pleasures. Of course it is hit or miss but much more enjoyable.

                            Davydd (Anglicized Welsh name for David...that's all)
                            Certified BPT Taster Pursuing Pork Tenderloin Sandwiches
                            Long lost Speedway Sparkplug thrashing about in the deep woods of Minnesota

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Indyknut View Post

                              In the mid 60’s my Dad was a marketing guy for the brewing company that produced Carling and Stag beer. They were based in St.Louis at the time. I’ve still got some unusual Carling Black Label items in my house.
                              Did you save one of the inflatable Mabel dolls?
                              "Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard." H.L. Mencken

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                              • #30
                                Oh, you said BEER. I thought I read BEAR.

                                Well, anyway, here's a beer bear.

                                s-l1600.jpg
                                You've worked so hard on the kidney. Very special -- the kidney has a very special place in the heart. It's an incredible thing. Donald John Trump

                                Brian's Wish * Jason Foundation

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