Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1976 Cosworth Vega

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 1976 Cosworth Vega

    I saw this at The James Dean Festival in Fairmount on Saturday & couldn't resist taking a couple pics in rememberance of this particular car being mentioned in a TF thread last week...





  • #2
    A great little car that never lived up to its expectations. GM kept lowering the compression ratio and generally detuning even before it went on sale. It could have been a truly "hot" car but was pretty much a dud as it never really got much out of its DOHC engine layout. GM never did anything right with any Vega.

    Comment


    • #3
      indyrjc:And it was expensive as hell...It was $600 less than a Vette, at $6065. That's why there are only a handful of them on the planet...
      My major malfunction is...I want the people I love and respect to live forever...The problem is...Life don't work that way...

      P.S. Questions, comments, death threats, invitations to a pigs bris, my number is still (317) 809-4483

      Comment


      • #4
        And the Vega in general was a POS. My best friend's brother had a base model bought new and it was constantly breaking down. I drove it once or twice and it was badly underpowered and the shifter was the loosest piece-o-crap I've ever experienced.

        Comment


        • #5
          That was the tradeoff with the Vega. The early ones had plenty of power and rusted on the dealer lot (sometimes literally). The later ones didn't rust but barely ran. My oldest brother had an aluminum block '75 that he had to add a quart of oil to every week.

          Oddly enough, apparently to prove they could do even worse, they followed it with the Monza...
          "I didn't hear a single comment about airboxes, "carbashians", or how terrible the car looked. I did see dozens and dozens of little kids in awe of the speed and how cool the cars looked. We should learn from our children."
          --Danny Noonan

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by skypigeon View Post
            That was the tradeoff with the Vega. The early ones had plenty of power and rusted on the dealer lot (sometimes literally). The later ones didn't rust but barely ran. My oldest brother had an aluminum block '75 that he had to add a quart of oil to every week.

            Oddly enough, apparently to prove they could do even worse, they followed it with the Monza...
            Yeah. My dad traded in his classic electronic clutch '68 Beetle on a Monza. Another in a long history of bad car moves my dad made (don't get me started or I'll tell you the story of the brand new '57 Chevy loaded with every option...).

            Comment


            • #7
              Ever have the chance to run your hand around the inside of a Vega block cylinder bore. It was so ROUGH, I knew from day one that there was no way they could ever get a decent seal around the rings on these things.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by skypigeon View Post
                ...Oddly enough, apparently to prove they could do even worse, they followed it with the Monza...
                Talk about an engineering fiasco. They shoe-horned a small
                V-8 in it and to change the two rear spark plugs, you had to pull the motor mount bolts and either jack up or drop the engine (I can't remember which it was).

                I had the Buick version (SkyHawk) with a 231 V-6. Now that was a fun car to drive. The only problem was it wouldn't idle worth a damn - it loped due to the crankshaft / cam configuration. This problem was fixed in following years.

                Comment


                • #9
                  My dad's Monza was a 4 popper with a sloppy shifter, just like a Vega. The only difference between the base cars was slightly larger, "updated" bodywork, IIRC.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Indy-hp View Post
                    My dad's Monza was a 4 popper with a sloppy shifter, just like a Vega. The only difference between the base cars was slightly larger, "updated" bodywork, IIRC.
                    They raced 'em in IMSA GT with the Corvette engine, which was possible because they were AVIALABLE with a 350 V-8. IIRC, the problem was, you had to have a perfect driving record to insure one. They handled like Mr. Magoo, and were so fast they scared Grumpy Jenkins.

                    P.S. I saw the factory bring them out at the Del Mar Grand Prix....I drooled for a week.
                    My major malfunction is...I want the people I love and respect to live forever...The problem is...Life don't work that way...

                    P.S. Questions, comments, death threats, invitations to a pigs bris, my number is still (317) 809-4483

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by roach View Post
                      Talk about an engineering fiasco. They shoe-horned a small
                      V-8 in it and to change the two rear spark plugs, you had to pull the motor mount bolts and either jack up or drop the engine (I can't remember which it was).

                      I had the Buick version (SkyHawk) with a 231 V-6. Now that was a fun car to drive. The only problem was it wouldn't idle worth a damn - it loped due to the crankshaft / cam configuration. This problem was fixed in following years.
                      If you'd a put an Indy V-6 into it, you'd still be drivin it.
                      P.S. Remember Tom Sneva's golf cart?
                      My major malfunction is...I want the people I love and respect to live forever...The problem is...Life don't work that way...

                      P.S. Questions, comments, death threats, invitations to a pigs bris, my number is still (317) 809-4483

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Indy-hp View Post
                        My dad's Monza was a 4 popper with a sloppy shifter, just like a Vega. The only difference between the base cars was slightly larger, "updated" bodywork, IIRC.



                        I guees I'm in the minoirity....I loved the vega I alaways went withe astre. The pontiac version. Started with a 350, afterwards a 427. Car kept getting ripped in half even with re enforcment.


                        I have only seen one cosworth. Not sure it was worth the hype.
                        .....every dog was born free to live, even if it means dying.

                        fav car pics
                        http://s197.photobucket.com/albums/a...%20car%20pics/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by abuseddog View Post
                          ...I have only seen one cosworth. Not sure it was worth the hype.
                          I don't know if I ever saw one but I sure as hell heard one! Someone put a CV engine in a midget and debuted it at the indoor races at Ft. Wayne. The only time my ears ever hurt from the sound of a racing engine!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by abuseddog View Post
                            I guees I'm in the minoirity....I loved the vega I alaways went withe astre. The pontiac version. Started with a 350, afterwards a 427. Car kept getting ripped in half even with re enforcment.


                            I have only seen one cosworth. Not sure it was worth the hype.
                            Oh, it was worth the hype, it just wasn't worth $6000 US, in 1976...

                            P.S. If I remember right, those things were an insurance claim waiting to happen. Midget racers LOVED the engines, and paid BIG for the motors. And after the clown spent six grand on one and a 289 1967 Mustang would eat its lunch, it was time to cut a deal. Like somebody said, they kept droppin' the compression/ HP, until it wouldn't get out of its own way.
                            My major malfunction is...I want the people I love and respect to live forever...The problem is...Life don't work that way...

                            P.S. Questions, comments, death threats, invitations to a pigs bris, my number is still (317) 809-4483

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MoparsRule View Post
                              I saw this at The James Dean Festival in Fairmount on Saturday & couldn't resist taking a couple pics in rememberance of this particular car being mentioned in a TF thread last week...




                              Funny sign. "4 value per cylinder"

                              And the '75 Sevillie was the first with American car with electronic fuel injection.

                              Comment

                              Unconfigured Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X